Archive of: September, 2019

Archive

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextIt is time well spent!
image/cms/resources/images.jpeg
imageAltCargilfield
leftColBody

A Hurdle that can be Jumped!

Question: What do all of these Form 6 maths problems have in common?

  • Work out three quarters of 48
  • Express 105 as a product of its prime factors.
  • Multiply 479 by 34
  • Find the area of a triangle with base 8 metres and height 9 metres.
  • Add 3/8 and 7/12
  • Solve 7x + 2 = 37

Answer:  At the most basic, they all require the use of times tables in one form or another.

(See the websites: mymaths and ttrockstars)

The phrase ‘times tables’ elicits a wide range of responses amongst children: from the animated, hand-waving readiness.… to the slow slump in the chair – a perceptible embodiment of the dread that they feel within. 

Most students’ feelings lie between these extremes and are dependent on which times table is in question or how recently they gave them any thought.  

Whatever a student’s feelings about them, times tables are still fundamental to learning maths.

Confidence in the subject relies heavily on a robust knowledge of tables since they impact on or support most maths topics that are learned in school.  Their use goes well beyond the fairly unsubtle 7 × 8 = 56 as used in basic operations, including area, volume and ratios… to their use in simple applications such as division: 56 ÷ 8 = 7, fractions: ¼ of 24 = 6 and then onto identifying factors and multiples, identifying and utilising prime numbers, selecting lowest common denominators, simplifying fractions and solving equations.

Knowing the times tables, almost on reflex, frees up processing power for tackling the prescribed problems rather than taking the focus off the job at hand to deal with finding the answer to 7 × 8, for example.

By the time children reach Form 6 we like them to be comfortable and quick with the whole range of times tables and be able to identify the multiples of each times table too. 

Here are some learning targets:

1) Quick recall of the 2-12 times tables as they are usually written: 1 × 2 = 2, 2 × 2 = 4, etc.

2)    Know in which times tables multiples can be found (finding factors): 24 is in 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12 times tables but 11 is only a multiple in the 1 and 11 tables.

3)    Know them ‘backwards’ (division): 72 ÷ 6 = 7,   66 ÷ 6 = 11, etc.

4)    Recognising multiples of a number. e.g.  Which of these numbers are multiples of 4?  10, 16, 28, 30

    5)   Divisibility tests for 2 to 9 times tables.

    By and large, times tables will need to be learned by practice and more practice, whether on paper, spoken out loud, playing games or on the wide range of apps available. 

    Learning times tables can be hard work but it doesn’t have to be boring and here are a couple of links to websites that Cargilfield subscribes to which can make learning them less arduous and, dare I say, fun!

    Mathematics presents a world of interesting puzzles and problems but sometimes it’s just the simple things that hold us back from enjoying these fully.

    rightColBody
    signoff
    og_titleValue of knowing your Times Tables
    og_description
    og_image
    og_type
    itemID963
    postID963
    blogID1
    postTitleValue of knowing your Times Tables
    postSlug2019-09-24-value-of-knowing-your-times-tables
    postDateTime2019-09-24 11:13:00
    postDescRaw
    postDescHTML
    postDynamicFields{"introText":"It is time well{...}
    postTags
    postStatusPublished
    authorID3
    sectionID9
    postCommentCount0
    postImportID
    postLegacyURL
    postAllowComments1
    postTemplatepost.html
    postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
    postIsPublished0
    sortval2019-09-24 11:13:00
    htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
    pagingfalse
    total3
    number_of_pages1
    total_pages1
    per_page10
    current_page1
    lower_bound1
    upper_bound3
    prev_url
    next_url
    prev_page_number
    next_page_number
    first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=09
    last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=09
    first_pagetrue
    last_pagetrue
    perch_introTextIt is time well spent!
    perch_image/cms/resources/images.jpeg
    perch_imageAltCargilfield
    perch_leftColBody

    A Hurdle that can be Jumped!

    Question: What do all of these Form 6 maths problems have in common?

    • Work out three quarters of 48
    • Express 105 as a product of its prime factors.
    • Multiply 479 by 34
    • Find the area of a triangle with base 8 metres and height 9 metres.
    • Add 3/8 and 7/12
    • Solve 7x + 2 = 37

    Answer:  At the most basic, they all require the use of times tables in one form or another.

    (See the websites: mymaths and ttrockstars)

    The phrase ‘times tables’ elicits a wide range of responses amongst children: from the animated, hand-waving readiness.… to the slow slump in the chair – a perceptible embodiment of the dread that they feel within. 

    Most students’ feelings lie between these extremes and are dependent on which times table is in question or how recently they gave them any thought.  

    Whatever a student’s feelings about them, times tables are still fundamental to learning maths.

    Confidence in the subject relies heavily on a robust knowledge of tables since they impact on or support most maths topics that are learned in school.  Their use goes well beyond the fairly unsubtle 7 × 8 = 56 as used in basic operations, including area, volume and ratios… to their use in simple applications such as division: 56 ÷ 8 = 7, fractions: ¼ of 24 = 6 and then onto identifying factors and multiples, identifying and utilising prime numbers, selecting lowest common denominators, simplifying fractions and solving equations.

    Knowing the times tables, almost on reflex, frees up processing power for tackling the prescribed problems rather than taking the focus off the job at hand to deal with finding the answer to 7 × 8, for example.

    By the time children reach Form 6 we like them to be comfortable and quick with the whole range of times tables and be able to identify the multiples of each times table too. 

    Here are some learning targets:

    1) Quick recall of the 2-12 times tables as they are usually written: 1 × 2 = 2, 2 × 2 = 4, etc.

    2)    Know in which times tables multiples can be found (finding factors): 24 is in 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12 times tables but 11 is only a multiple in the 1 and 11 tables.

    3)    Know them ‘backwards’ (division): 72 ÷ 6 = 7,   66 ÷ 6 = 11, etc.

    4)    Recognising multiples of a number. e.g.  Which of these numbers are multiples of 4?  10, 16, 28, 30

      5)   Divisibility tests for 2 to 9 times tables.

      By and large, times tables will need to be learned by practice and more practice, whether on paper, spoken out loud, playing games or on the wide range of apps available. 

      Learning times tables can be hard work but it doesn’t have to be boring and here are a couple of links to websites that Cargilfield subscribes to which can make learning them less arduous and, dare I say, fun!

      Mathematics presents a world of interesting puzzles and problems but sometimes it’s just the simple things that hold us back from enjoying these fully.

      perch_rightColBody
      perch_signoff
      perch_og_titleValue of knowing your Times Tables
      perch_og_description
      perch_og_image
      perch_og_type
      authorGivenNameDavid
      authorFamilyNameWalker
      authorEmail[email protected]
      authorPostCount1929
      authorSlugdavid-walker
      authorImportRef
      authorDynamicFields
      postURL/news/post.php?s=2019-09-24-value-of-knowing-your-times-tables
      postURLFullhttp://www.cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2019-09-24-value-of-knowing-your-times-tables
      perch_item_firsttrue
      perch_item_zero_index0
      perch_item_index1
      perch_item_rev_index3
      perch_item_rev_zero_index2
      perch_item_odd
      perch_item_count3
      perch_index_in_set1
      perch_zero_index_in_set0
      perch_first_in_settrue
      perch_namespaceperch:blog
      Cargilfield

      Value of knowing your Times Tables

      It is time well spent!

      Read More


      Posted on

      IDValue
      perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
      introTextHow to support children in their learning
      image/cms/resources/img1467.jpg
      imageAltCargilfield
      leftColBody

      Active learning is a concept which is widely applied in education and one which many of us here at Cargilfield embrace.  It is a pedagogy that essentially has the child at the centre of the learning.  

      Active learning focuses more on how children learn and not just on what they learn.

      Through active learning children are encouraged to apply their own thinking rather than to passively absorb the information which is shared with them.  Research over many years has shown us that understanding is not transferred to children simply by telling them what they need to know.  Instead, the engagement with the given task, on a number of levels, makes sure that the child’s thinking is challenged and ensures that it is robust as they build upon previous learning.  

      Active learning empowers children to engage in their own learning; building their knowledge and understanding as they respond to learning opportunities provided by their teacher.  Essentially, it is based on the concept of ‘constructivism’which focuses on the fact that learners build or constructtheir own understanding through applying and experimenting with the concepts they are trying to understand.  

      Learning is therefore, seen as a process of ‘making meaning’.  Children are able to develop their existing knowledge and understanding to achieve a deeper level of understanding as they learn.  This, as a result, empowers them to apply the higher order skills of Blooms Taxonomysuch as analysing, evaluating and synthesising ideas to their own learning.

      The role of the teacher, therefore, is to provide contexts and opportunities for this to take place; enabling deeper levels of understanding, curiosity and engagement.  Constructivism maintains that learning primarily happens through social interaction with others.  A theory which is vigorously embraced through active learning here at Cargilfield!

      Lev Vygotsky, possibly the most famous constructivist, developed the idea of the ‘Zone of Proximal Development’.  This ‘zone’ lies between what the learner can achieve independently and what they can achieve when supported by their teacher’s expert guidance.  As skilled teachers, we focus on learning activities within ‘the zone’.  The teacher can scaffold each child’s learning by providing guidance and support that challenges the child based on their current ability which then allows them to develop their understanding gradually; ensuring that each increment in learning is built on solid foundations.  

      Skilled teachers also provide meaningful feedback. This is ultimately based upon the concept of ‘Assessment is for Learning’ which ensures two things; firstly that each child is aware of their current strengths and weaknesses and secondly that they know what to do to help them improve.  It is important to remember, however, that learning experiences for children are developmental and that learning should be appropriate to their level of development.  This is often linked to their age although not always the same.

      rightColBody

      Active learning helps children become lifelong learners, encourages them to be successful and provides engaging and exciting learning opportunities for them to participate in each day.  

      There are some key questions which we, as teachers, keep in mind when engaging with active learning;

      - What do the children in my class need to learn?

      - How will the task that I have chosen help the children to learn?

      - How am I using questioning as part of the learning?

      - Am I creating a positive classroom environment where it’s fine to take intellectual risks?

      - How will I know that the children are learning?

      It is critical when we do our long, medium and weekly planning that we consider; how will we engage with active learning to ensure that the child and the learning are at the centre of the process.  It is important to remember, therefore, that tasks can be relatively simple but still get the children to think critically and independently.  Likewise, a complicated task does not always help to develop a child’s thinking or understanding. This is crucial to consider and something which we embed in the planning process here at Cargilfield.

      The key idea for us, as teachers, to remember is; that children must be empowered to think and engageduring their time at school and not just be passive recipients of an increasing bank of knowledge.

      signoff
      og_titleWhat is 'Active Learning'?
      og_description
      og_image
      og_type
      itemID916
      postID916
      blogID1
      postTitleWhat is 'Active Learning'?
      postSlug2019-09-09-what-is-active-learning
      postDateTime2019-09-09 09:44:00
      postDescRaw
      postDescHTML
      postDynamicFields{"introText":"How to support children in their learning","image":{"assetID":"4495","title":"IMG{...}
      postTags
      postStatusPublished
      authorID3
      sectionID9
      postCommentCount0
      postImportID
      postLegacyURL
      postAllowComments1
      postTemplatepost.html
      postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
      postIsPublished0
      sortval2019-09-09 09:44:00
      htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
      pagingfalse
      total3
      number_of_pages1
      total_pages1
      per_page10
      current_page1
      lower_bound1
      upper_bound3
      prev_url
      next_url
      prev_page_number
      next_page_number
      first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=09
      last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=09
      first_pagetrue
      last_pagetrue
      perch_introTextHow to support children in their learning
      perch_image/cms/resources/img1467.jpg
      perch_imageAltCargilfield
      perch_leftColBody

      Active learning is a concept which is widely applied in education and one which many of us here at Cargilfield embrace.  It is a pedagogy that essentially has the child at the centre of the learning.  

      Active learning focuses more on how children learn and not just on what they learn.

      Through active learning children are encouraged to apply their own thinking rather than to passively absorb the information which is shared with them.  Research over many years has shown us that understanding is not transferred to children simply by telling them what they need to know.  Instead, the engagement with the given task, on a number of levels, makes sure that the child’s thinking is challenged and ensures that it is robust as they build upon previous learning.  

      Active learning empowers children to engage in their own learning; building their knowledge and understanding as they respond to learning opportunities provided by their teacher.  Essentially, it is based on the concept of ‘constructivism’which focuses on the fact that learners build or constructtheir own understanding through applying and experimenting with the concepts they are trying to understand.  

      Learning is therefore, seen as a process of ‘making meaning’.  Children are able to develop their existing knowledge and understanding to achieve a deeper level of understanding as they learn.  This, as a result, empowers them to apply the higher order skills of Blooms Taxonomysuch as analysing, evaluating and synthesising ideas to their own learning.

      The role of the teacher, therefore, is to provide contexts and opportunities for this to take place; enabling deeper levels of understanding, curiosity and engagement.  Constructivism maintains that learning primarily happens through social interaction with others.  A theory which is vigorously embraced through active learning here at Cargilfield!

      Lev Vygotsky, possibly the most famous constructivist, developed the idea of the ‘Zone of Proximal Development’.  This ‘zone’ lies between what the learner can achieve independently and what they can achieve when supported by their teacher’s expert guidance.  As skilled teachers, we focus on learning activities within ‘the zone’.  The teacher can scaffold each child’s learning by providing guidance and support that challenges the child based on their current ability which then allows them to develop their understanding gradually; ensuring that each increment in learning is built on solid foundations.  

      Skilled teachers also provide meaningful feedback. This is ultimately based upon the concept of ‘Assessment is for Learning’ which ensures two things; firstly that each child is aware of their current strengths and weaknesses and secondly that they know what to do to help them improve.  It is important to remember, however, that learning experiences for children are developmental and that learning should be appropriate to their level of development.  This is often linked to their age although not always the same.

      perch_rightColBody

      Active learning helps children become lifelong learners, encourages them to be successful and provides engaging and exciting learning opportunities for them to participate in each day.  

      There are some key questions which we, as teachers, keep in mind when engaging with active learning;

      - What do the children in my class need to learn?

      - How will the task that I have chosen help the children to learn?

      - How am I using questioning as part of the learning?

      - Am I creating a positive classroom environment where it’s fine to take intellectual risks?

      - How will I know that the children are learning?

      It is critical when we do our long, medium and weekly planning that we consider; how will we engage with active learning to ensure that the child and the learning are at the centre of the process.  It is important to remember, therefore, that tasks can be relatively simple but still get the children to think critically and independently.  Likewise, a complicated task does not always help to develop a child’s thinking or understanding. This is crucial to consider and something which we embed in the planning process here at Cargilfield.

      The key idea for us, as teachers, to remember is; that children must be empowered to think and engageduring their time at school and not just be passive recipients of an increasing bank of knowledge.

      perch_signoff
      perch_og_titleWhat is 'Active Learning'?
      perch_og_description
      perch_og_image
      perch_og_type
      authorGivenNameDavid
      authorFamilyNameWalker
      authorEmail[email protected]
      authorPostCount1929
      authorSlugdavid-walker
      authorImportRef
      authorDynamicFields
      postURL/news/post.php?s=2019-09-09-what-is-active-learning
      postURLFullhttp://www.cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2019-09-09-what-is-active-learning
      perch_item_zero_index1
      perch_item_index2
      perch_item_rev_index2
      perch_item_rev_zero_index1
      perch_item_oddodd
      perch_item_count3
      perch_index_in_set2
      perch_zero_index_in_set1
      perch_namespaceperch:blog
      Cargilfield

      What is 'Active Learning'?

      How to support children in their learning

      Read More


      Posted on

      IDValue
      perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
      introTextMaking the most of the great Scottish Outdoors
      image/cms/resources/img3761.jpg
      imageAltCargilfield
      leftColBody

      As we embark on yet another exciting academic year at Cargilfield, one of the first tasks I undertake is to scrutinise the school calendar and ensure that I am planning ahead for the busy new term!  I am always struck by the myriad of opportunities afforded to our pupils and by the variety of learning experiences we provide for them, in line with our school ethos is ‘learning is an everyday adventure’.

      It is a privilege therefore, as a teacher of the Humanities subjects to be able to make the most of the outdoor classroom whether locally or further afield. So many school pupils nowadays are deprived of the chance to learn outside of the traditional classroom setting for reasons such as cost, lack of curriculum time or worries about safety. 

      IMG 3798


      As a geography specialist I can only be thankful that at Cargilfield, we are encouraged to widen the horizons of our pupils and their experiences of the environment in ‘real time’. Fieldwork is an essential component of geography education enabling the pupils to develop subject knowledge and gain a range of skills that are difficult to develop in the classroom alone. Being outside, in different habitats offers exciting challenges that many students may not otherwise experience. 

      There are many social benefits for the pupils who gain a great deal from the time spent working together in different environments. The sensory nature of being in the field can’t be replicated in a classroom setting and the scale and beauty of our surroundings are best appreciated by being immersed completely. How better to appreciate the awe and wonder of our landscape than to go and see it for yourself.

      Geography without fieldwork has been described as being like science without experiments. Thankfully, this year once again, our pupils will be out and about not only in Humanities subjects but in all curriculum areas where their love of learning with be further ignited and their skills enhanced.

      C4e63237 7e75 4f83 9f44 ff8b1d33c8c3

      rightColBody
      signoff
      og_titleThe Outdoor Classroom
      og_description
      og_image
      og_type
      itemID906
      postID906
      blogID1
      postTitleThe Outdoor Classroom
      postSlug2019-09-03-the-outdoor-classroom
      postDateTime2019-09-03 14:48:00
      postDescRaw
      postDescHTML
      postDynamicFields{"introText":"Making the most of the great Scottish{...}
      postTags
      postStatusPublished
      authorID3
      sectionID9
      postCommentCount0
      postImportID
      postLegacyURL
      postAllowComments1
      postTemplatepost.html
      postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
      postIsPublished0
      sortval2019-09-03 14:48:00
      htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
      pagingfalse
      total3
      number_of_pages1
      total_pages1
      per_page10
      current_page1
      lower_bound1
      upper_bound3
      prev_url
      next_url
      prev_page_number
      next_page_number
      first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=09
      last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=09
      first_pagetrue
      last_pagetrue
      perch_introTextMaking the most of the great Scottish Outdoors
      perch_image/cms/resources/img3761.jpg
      perch_imageAltCargilfield
      perch_leftColBody

      As we embark on yet another exciting academic year at Cargilfield, one of the first tasks I undertake is to scrutinise the school calendar and ensure that I am planning ahead for the busy new term!  I am always struck by the myriad of opportunities afforded to our pupils and by the variety of learning experiences we provide for them, in line with our school ethos is ‘learning is an everyday adventure’.

      It is a privilege therefore, as a teacher of the Humanities subjects to be able to make the most of the outdoor classroom whether locally or further afield. So many school pupils nowadays are deprived of the chance to learn outside of the traditional classroom setting for reasons such as cost, lack of curriculum time or worries about safety. 

      IMG 3798


      As a geography specialist I can only be thankful that at Cargilfield, we are encouraged to widen the horizons of our pupils and their experiences of the environment in ‘real time’. Fieldwork is an essential component of geography education enabling the pupils to develop subject knowledge and gain a range of skills that are difficult to develop in the classroom alone. Being outside, in different habitats offers exciting challenges that many students may not otherwise experience. 

      There are many social benefits for the pupils who gain a great deal from the time spent working together in different environments. The sensory nature of being in the field can’t be replicated in a classroom setting and the scale and beauty of our surroundings are best appreciated by being immersed completely. How better to appreciate the awe and wonder of our landscape than to go and see it for yourself.

      Geography without fieldwork has been described as being like science without experiments. Thankfully, this year once again, our pupils will be out and about not only in Humanities subjects but in all curriculum areas where their love of learning with be further ignited and their skills enhanced.

      C4e63237 7e75 4f83 9f44 ff8b1d33c8c3

      perch_rightColBody
      perch_signoff
      perch_og_titleThe Outdoor Classroom
      perch_og_description
      perch_og_image
      perch_og_type
      authorGivenNameDavid
      authorFamilyNameWalker
      authorEmail[email protected]
      authorPostCount1929
      authorSlugdavid-walker
      authorImportRef
      authorDynamicFields
      postURL/news/post.php?s=2019-09-03-the-outdoor-classroom
      postURLFullhttp://www.cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2019-09-03-the-outdoor-classroom
      perch_item_lasttrue
      perch_item_zero_index2
      perch_item_index3
      perch_item_rev_index1
      perch_item_rev_zero_index0
      perch_item_odd
      perch_item_count3
      perch_index_in_set3
      perch_zero_index_in_set2
      perch_last_in_settrue
      perch_namespaceperch:blog
      Cargilfield

      The Outdoor Classroom

      Making the most of the great Scottish Outdoors

      Read More


      Posted on

      Cargilfield where everyday is an adventure

      Welcome to Cargilfield! We hope this short film gives you a glimpse of what life is like for the girls and boys at our school. We would love to welcome you in person to tour Cargilfield and explain more fully exactly what makes a Cargilfield education so special and so different. Please get in touch with Fiona Craig, our Registrar if you would like to find out more; her email address is [email protected] or you can telephone her on 0131 336 2207.

      Don't Show Again