Archive of: January, 2020

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introTextThe golden rule at Cargilfield
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The children in the Pre-Prep at Cargilfield love it when Mr Taylor pops in for an assembly and mentions his three school rules. Everyone from Primary One to Primary Three choruses Rule 1-Be kind, Rule 2-Be kind, Rule 3-Be kind. 

For teachers of young children there are few more important rules to teach to any age of child. 

Be kind to the other children in your class. You will make more friends if you behave like this and you will feel really good about yourself. 

Be kind to other children in school including brothers and sisters! Treat other children the way you would like to be treated yourself. 

Be kind to adults who work in school. Be polite, friendly and helpful to grown ups who work with you and you will find life will go more smoothly. 

Be kind to mum and dad. You love them, so show it with your behaviour to them. Try to do what they ask you to do and see if there is anything you could do to help them to make their life easier. Just give them a hug now and again!

Be kind to yourself. Get enough sleep, don’t spend too much time online, eat healthily and play outside often. 

For teachers of young children there are few more important rules to stick to when working with any age of child. This doesn’t mean spoiling the children or excusing unpleasant behaviour, but dealing with issues and talking them through instead of just reprimanding pupils when things go wrong. Children usually misbehave for a reason, whether it is boredom, frustration, reacting to another’s behaviour towards them or just waking up in a bad mood. 

Be kind to the children in your class. Body language, tone of voice and eye contact are so important to demonstrate to the children that you are really listening to them and that what they say and think really matters to you. They may be young, but they can tell if you are really fully engaged in their communication. Greeting them in the mornings and having an individual conversation makes them feel an instant connection each day.

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Be kind to the children you come into contact with each day. In the same way engage with other children in the school, comment positively on behaviour, uniform etc and develop a positive relationship with others. If you can’t say something positive try to use constructive criticism. 

Be kind to your colleagues and ancillary staff. However busy you are, make the time to socialise at some point in your working day. Find out a little about your colleagues so that you understand what they are dealing with when they leave school each day –young children, older relatives, medical issues or financial problems. 

Be kind to the parents of children in your care. Be understanding if they are grumpy or have forgotten their child’s kit and homework for the third time that week. They may be juggling other children, stressful times at work or difficult emotional issues. Keep them informed of school events coming up and give them honest feedback about their child regularly making sure they are aware of day to day activities in class. 

Be kind to yourself. Make sure you have time for yourself and have life outside school. Whether you choose to pamper yourself at a spa, push yourself physically with sport or exercise, singing in a choir, playing in an orchestra, watching a movie, climbing a hill, reading a bestseller, having a great meal, knitting a jumper or retail therapy. It makes such a difference if the teacher comes in fresh each day with a positive response to their day in the classroom. 

Leading by example is essential of course-be kind, be kind, be kind. 

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perch_introTextThe golden rule at Cargilfield
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The children in the Pre-Prep at Cargilfield love it when Mr Taylor pops in for an assembly and mentions his three school rules. Everyone from Primary One to Primary Three choruses Rule 1-Be kind, Rule 2-Be kind, Rule 3-Be kind. 

For teachers of young children there are few more important rules to teach to any age of child. 

Be kind to the other children in your class. You will make more friends if you behave like this and you will feel really good about yourself. 

Be kind to other children in school including brothers and sisters! Treat other children the way you would like to be treated yourself. 

Be kind to adults who work in school. Be polite, friendly and helpful to grown ups who work with you and you will find life will go more smoothly. 

Be kind to mum and dad. You love them, so show it with your behaviour to them. Try to do what they ask you to do and see if there is anything you could do to help them to make their life easier. Just give them a hug now and again!

Be kind to yourself. Get enough sleep, don’t spend too much time online, eat healthily and play outside often. 

For teachers of young children there are few more important rules to stick to when working with any age of child. This doesn’t mean spoiling the children or excusing unpleasant behaviour, but dealing with issues and talking them through instead of just reprimanding pupils when things go wrong. Children usually misbehave for a reason, whether it is boredom, frustration, reacting to another’s behaviour towards them or just waking up in a bad mood. 

Be kind to the children in your class. Body language, tone of voice and eye contact are so important to demonstrate to the children that you are really listening to them and that what they say and think really matters to you. They may be young, but they can tell if you are really fully engaged in their communication. Greeting them in the mornings and having an individual conversation makes them feel an instant connection each day.

perch_rightColBody

Be kind to the children you come into contact with each day. In the same way engage with other children in the school, comment positively on behaviour, uniform etc and develop a positive relationship with others. If you can’t say something positive try to use constructive criticism. 

Be kind to your colleagues and ancillary staff. However busy you are, make the time to socialise at some point in your working day. Find out a little about your colleagues so that you understand what they are dealing with when they leave school each day –young children, older relatives, medical issues or financial problems. 

Be kind to the parents of children in your care. Be understanding if they are grumpy or have forgotten their child’s kit and homework for the third time that week. They may be juggling other children, stressful times at work or difficult emotional issues. Keep them informed of school events coming up and give them honest feedback about their child regularly making sure they are aware of day to day activities in class. 

Be kind to yourself. Make sure you have time for yourself and have life outside school. Whether you choose to pamper yourself at a spa, push yourself physically with sport or exercise, singing in a choir, playing in an orchestra, watching a movie, climbing a hill, reading a bestseller, having a great meal, knitting a jumper or retail therapy. It makes such a difference if the teacher comes in fresh each day with a positive response to their day in the classroom. 

Leading by example is essential of course-be kind, be kind, be kind. 

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Cargilfield

Importance of being kind!

The golden rule at Cargilfield

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introTextBroadening understanding of the Ancient World
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Oh no! He is on about his maps again….

Following on from the success of using Digital Maps in the classroom last year, the website took off and has become so much more! 

The project has evolved into a crusade to broaden my pupils’ understanding of the Ancient World; from learning about Greek myths, dabbling in some Egyptian Hieroglyphs or finding a new book to read. 

As we know, the Common Entrance and Scholarship syllabi are grammar orientated but do provide wonderful and fascinating stories for the candidates to translate based on Greek mythology or historical events from the Roman Empire. By having a good understanding of these myths and historical events, the candidates will find tricky translations much easier and less likely to panic or give up by knowing the story behind it.

The Greek Mythology section has detailed accounts of the major gods and goddesses and the myths that surround them, which is a good starting point for anyone interested in the Ancient World.

This can also be combined with the Recommended Reading, which provides pupils with an extended reading list of books based of Greek Mythology and the Roman Empire, combining a passion for reading and learning. Other recommendations include TV & Film and Video Games.

Image

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Pupils can also access all of the resources that they will need for Common Entrance in the Languages section under Latin and Ancient Greek, as well as the Revision section of the School website.

The use of social media has also be implemented in conjunction with the website to promote the resources available to a wider audience in general and of School Classics departments. It has been a useful tool to network with other Classics teachers from the UK and abroad to share ideas and resources for the betterment of our students. It has also been useful CPD; engaging with Academics and Authors on their work for a better understanding of Ancient History and Classics.

This is all accessible on the website: www.digitalmapsoftheancientworld.com so that pupils can explore in their own time.

ROF

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perch_introTextBroadening understanding of the Ancient World
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Oh no! He is on about his maps again….

Following on from the success of using Digital Maps in the classroom last year, the website took off and has become so much more! 

The project has evolved into a crusade to broaden my pupils’ understanding of the Ancient World; from learning about Greek myths, dabbling in some Egyptian Hieroglyphs or finding a new book to read. 

As we know, the Common Entrance and Scholarship syllabi are grammar orientated but do provide wonderful and fascinating stories for the candidates to translate based on Greek mythology or historical events from the Roman Empire. By having a good understanding of these myths and historical events, the candidates will find tricky translations much easier and less likely to panic or give up by knowing the story behind it.

The Greek Mythology section has detailed accounts of the major gods and goddesses and the myths that surround them, which is a good starting point for anyone interested in the Ancient World.

This can also be combined with the Recommended Reading, which provides pupils with an extended reading list of books based of Greek Mythology and the Roman Empire, combining a passion for reading and learning. Other recommendations include TV & Film and Video Games.

Image

perch_rightColBody

Image

Pupils can also access all of the resources that they will need for Common Entrance in the Languages section under Latin and Ancient Greek, as well as the Revision section of the School website.

The use of social media has also be implemented in conjunction with the website to promote the resources available to a wider audience in general and of School Classics departments. It has been a useful tool to network with other Classics teachers from the UK and abroad to share ideas and resources for the betterment of our students. It has also been useful CPD; engaging with Academics and Authors on their work for a better understanding of Ancient History and Classics.

This is all accessible on the website: www.digitalmapsoftheancientworld.com so that pupils can explore in their own time.

ROF

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Cargilfield

Digital Maps of the Ancient World

Broadening understanding of the Ancient World

Read More


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Why do we have to go to chapel if we’re not religious?

A comment I have heard many a time.  On the face of it, one could simply agree.  However, going to chapel is so much more than a place of prayer and worship.  It is a coming together of a community to be in a place of calm where one can reflect and have some time to think.  Yes, in our morning chapel time we have a reading and a prayer but one can take out of that what they wish.  The readings are often based around a story that has a moral, and whether the listener is religious or not, I would like to think they would aspire to be a moral and sensitive-to-others kind of person.  

But as I have said, going to chapel is so much more.  On a practical note, messages and announcements are made, it is a place to celebrate achievements, listen to musical treats of all kinds, from classical to pop, organs to rock guitars and drums, not to mention the fantastic plays that are put on regularly; and all in the beautiful and historic surroundings, complete with roaring fires and a beautiful Christmas tree in December.

Finally, why else do we go to chapel?  Because to do so reminds us of all those who braved the wars and fought for our country and freedom.  It is a poignant reminder of what we have now and to appreciate the goodness in our lives.  So, if your child isn’t religious but finds themselves still at chapel, please encourage them take in the surroundings and value what they have.

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Why do we have to go to chapel if we’re not religious?

A comment I have heard many a time.  On the face of it, one could simply agree.  However, going to chapel is so much more than a place of prayer and worship.  It is a coming together of a community to be in a place of calm where one can reflect and have some time to think.  Yes, in our morning chapel time we have a reading and a prayer but one can take out of that what they wish.  The readings are often based around a story that has a moral, and whether the listener is religious or not, I would like to think they would aspire to be a moral and sensitive-to-others kind of person.  

But as I have said, going to chapel is so much more.  On a practical note, messages and announcements are made, it is a place to celebrate achievements, listen to musical treats of all kinds, from classical to pop, organs to rock guitars and drums, not to mention the fantastic plays that are put on regularly; and all in the beautiful and historic surroundings, complete with roaring fires and a beautiful Christmas tree in December.

Finally, why else do we go to chapel?  Because to do so reminds us of all those who braved the wars and fought for our country and freedom.  It is a poignant reminder of what we have now and to appreciate the goodness in our lives.  So, if your child isn’t religious but finds themselves still at chapel, please encourage them take in the surroundings and value what they have.

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Cargilfieldd

Why do we have to go to chapel if we’re not religious?

Chapel at the heart of the school

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Cargilfield where everyday is an adventure

Welcome to Cargilfield! We hope this short film gives you a glimpse of what life is like for the girls and boys at our school. We would love to welcome you in person to tour Cargilfield and explain more fully exactly what makes a Cargilfield education so special and so different. Please get in touch with Fiona Craig, our Registrar if you would like to find out more; her email address is [email protected] or you can telephone her on 0131 336 2207.

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