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The phrase is enough to make a lot of feel just slightly uneasy. I thought it might be interesting to put some of my thoughts down on paper. 

When we entered this uncertain world in March we didn’t have a clear road map of where we were going with this. Nobody did. It has been great though to have such a resourceful group of staff and governors as we have started to edge our way through it. As you will know a tremendous amount of work has gone into getting this all up and running. One thing that I have really noticed is how helpful everyone has been. Back at school it is all to easy to get stuck in your own wee bubble and do what you always do. This has forced me to engage with people and ask for help, something we expect our children to do but perhaps we are not very good at ourselves.

Coming back to school after Easter, I think we were all a bit anxious. I was terrified. However, one thing that has been noticeable has been the enthusiasm and the resilience of our children. The younger ones in particular have adapted very quickly to all that this strange and constantly changing system has asked of them. Initial hiccups with technology seem largely to have been ironed out and we seem to be in a fairly stable routine.

The Form 8’s have for the most part stuck in. It will be interesting to see how remote CE goes next month but most of them are taking a careful and hardworking attitude to their preparation. This will have been very good practise for the situation that a lot of them will face at their senior school where much more studying is done online in this way.

IMG 3870

IMG 1448

rightColBody

 I have been reading about the way that different children have adapted to these tasks and certainly can see some of this in our children. In some, it brings out the best of them. Others find it more challenging. Often those children who get their energy from being in the classroom with their friends and feed off classroom discussion to stimulate their ideas are finding this hard. Hats off to some of my colleagues who have taught music lessons remotely or set maths challenges using paired and group working or conducted remote science experiments.  It is difficult to keep up the classroom feel when you are teaching online but it is something we have tried to do as far as we are able. Conversely, some children who find a noisy classroom a distraction have very much enjoyed the process of organising their own work and working largely to their own timetable. Some of them have definitely thrived which was not something I had expected.

The key here has been for us to engage with the children and parents themselves and keep communication going. This can be difficult. On occasion my heart has sunk a little bit when I think I have prepared something amazing and I am faced with a row of icons on mute.

 However, there have been some lessons for us all. Support and cooperation from my colleagues has been a high point. Learning to be flexible and being more aware of the needs of all our learners and working closely with their families, has been key. Overall, is far more important they our children come out of this in a confident and secure place emotionally than that they hand in that history essay.

AD

William weighing

8FFACADB 9627 4531 9B84 8CCCD3BB1C8C

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The phrase is enough to make a lot of feel just slightly uneasy. I thought it might be interesting to put some of my thoughts down on paper. 

When we entered this uncertain world in March we didn’t have a clear road map of where we were going with this. Nobody did. It has been great though to have such a resourceful group of staff and governors as we have started to edge our way through it. As you will know a tremendous amount of work has gone into getting this all up and running. One thing that I have really noticed is how helpful everyone has been. Back at school it is all to easy to get stuck in your own wee bubble and do what you always do. This has forced me to engage with people and ask for help, something we expect our children to do but perhaps we are not very good at ourselves.

Coming back to school after Easter, I think we were all a bit anxious. I was terrified. However, one thing that has been noticeable has been the enthusiasm and the resilience of our children. The younger ones in particular have adapted very quickly to all that this strange and constantly changing system has asked of them. Initial hiccups with technology seem largely to have been ironed out and we seem to be in a fairly stable routine.

The Form 8’s have for the most part stuck in. It will be interesting to see how remote CE goes next month but most of them are taking a careful and hardworking attitude to their preparation. This will have been very good practise for the situation that a lot of them will face at their senior school where much more studying is done online in this way.

IMG 3870

IMG 1448

perch_rightColBody

 I have been reading about the way that different children have adapted to these tasks and certainly can see some of this in our children. In some, it brings out the best of them. Others find it more challenging. Often those children who get their energy from being in the classroom with their friends and feed off classroom discussion to stimulate their ideas are finding this hard. Hats off to some of my colleagues who have taught music lessons remotely or set maths challenges using paired and group working or conducted remote science experiments.  It is difficult to keep up the classroom feel when you are teaching online but it is something we have tried to do as far as we are able. Conversely, some children who find a noisy classroom a distraction have very much enjoyed the process of organising their own work and working largely to their own timetable. Some of them have definitely thrived which was not something I had expected.

The key here has been for us to engage with the children and parents themselves and keep communication going. This can be difficult. On occasion my heart has sunk a little bit when I think I have prepared something amazing and I am faced with a row of icons on mute.

 However, there have been some lessons for us all. Support and cooperation from my colleagues has been a high point. Learning to be flexible and being more aware of the needs of all our learners and working closely with their families, has been key. Overall, is far more important they our children come out of this in a confident and secure place emotionally than that they hand in that history essay.

AD

William weighing

8FFACADB 9627 4531 9B84 8CCCD3BB1C8C

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Cargilfield

A few thoughts on Remote Learning

New ways of teaching and learning

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At Cargilfield the children are introduced to French in Nursery. They have one lesson a week, lasting approximately twenty minutes. This means that we can have children learning French from the age of three. People are often surprised to hear this, but young children’s brains are very receptive at this stage and they learn without being aware of it, learning through play. I have had children who having being very quiet on beginning Nursery, speak their first word in my lesson, and in French!

The learning is based on what is happening round about them, although I do try to cover certain topics. For example, when we are learning about colours and clothes, I point to the children’s clothes and shoes. They now love to show me new shoes or other items of clothing as soon as they arrive, allowing further consolidation of the new learning. We often count animals on new sweatshirts or jumpers and recently we all counted the numbers of unicorns on a little girl’s dress! 

In the same way, when we have learned, “Comment ҫa va?”and its possible responses, “ҫa ne va pas”with its thumbs down symbol, quickly becomes a favourite. On starting a lesson, the children are very keen to show me a grazed knee or a scratch on their hand. This becomes an opportunity to learn some of the parts of the body. These sessions often end with a rendition of Têteépaules, genoux et pieds! 

rightColBody

Of course, the children are too young to learn to read the French language but that does not mean they don’t enjoy looking at books in French. Just as in English, they are very quick to pick up the refrain. “J’ai toujours faim”, as said by the Hungry Caterpillar, is a good example of this.  This is a very useful story as we can go over colours, numbers, food, as well as learning the very useful “j’aime” and “je n’aime pas”, not forgetting metamorphosis! 

Our lessons also involve Pierre, my puppet, and a menagerie of other stuffed animals. It is fun to see the children using these soft toys to talk some basic French. We also have plenty of song and dance, which they love, and it always amazes me how quick they are to pick up little songs. They are expert copiers! Songs are also very useful for memory. They are plenty of children in the Upper School, who on hearing the word “anniversaire”, launch into the song, “Quelle est la date de ton anniversaire?”!

In these strange times we are experiencing, our learning is taking different forms. However, learning though play and by following our natural curiosity continue to be very valid for the older boys and girls just as much as for the younger ones.  Working out why different designs of paper planes fly better than others is a good example of this. It is playing with physics! Allowing children to wonder about why things happen or how things work and supporting them in finding out the answers is an excellent way for them to learn.

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At Cargilfield the children are introduced to French in Nursery. They have one lesson a week, lasting approximately twenty minutes. This means that we can have children learning French from the age of three. People are often surprised to hear this, but young children’s brains are very receptive at this stage and they learn without being aware of it, learning through play. I have had children who having being very quiet on beginning Nursery, speak their first word in my lesson, and in French!

The learning is based on what is happening round about them, although I do try to cover certain topics. For example, when we are learning about colours and clothes, I point to the children’s clothes and shoes. They now love to show me new shoes or other items of clothing as soon as they arrive, allowing further consolidation of the new learning. We often count animals on new sweatshirts or jumpers and recently we all counted the numbers of unicorns on a little girl’s dress! 

In the same way, when we have learned, “Comment ҫa va?”and its possible responses, “ҫa ne va pas”with its thumbs down symbol, quickly becomes a favourite. On starting a lesson, the children are very keen to show me a grazed knee or a scratch on their hand. This becomes an opportunity to learn some of the parts of the body. These sessions often end with a rendition of Têteépaules, genoux et pieds! 

perch_rightColBody

Of course, the children are too young to learn to read the French language but that does not mean they don’t enjoy looking at books in French. Just as in English, they are very quick to pick up the refrain. “J’ai toujours faim”, as said by the Hungry Caterpillar, is a good example of this.  This is a very useful story as we can go over colours, numbers, food, as well as learning the very useful “j’aime” and “je n’aime pas”, not forgetting metamorphosis! 

Our lessons also involve Pierre, my puppet, and a menagerie of other stuffed animals. It is fun to see the children using these soft toys to talk some basic French. We also have plenty of song and dance, which they love, and it always amazes me how quick they are to pick up little songs. They are expert copiers! Songs are also very useful for memory. They are plenty of children in the Upper School, who on hearing the word “anniversaire”, launch into the song, “Quelle est la date de ton anniversaire?”!

In these strange times we are experiencing, our learning is taking different forms. However, learning though play and by following our natural curiosity continue to be very valid for the older boys and girls just as much as for the younger ones.  Working out why different designs of paper planes fly better than others is a good example of this. It is playing with physics! Allowing children to wonder about why things happen or how things work and supporting them in finding out the answers is an excellent way for them to learn.

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Cargilfield

French in the Nursery

Learning something new

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Listening to music – is that even a skill?  Surely everyone can listen? Surely it’s natural to enjoy music? Or maybe it’s just something that musical people do?

The more I teach and observe young children interacting with recorded or live music, the more I realise that there is a lot more to it than that. I am no psychologist, so this may not be the correct terminology, but it seems to me that listening to music is a cultural behaviour that quite definitely does need teaching. Yes, there are definitely those who from a very young age seem particularly transfixed by musical performances, but not being one of those people doesn’t seem to relate to a lack of musical ability at a later age – just a different personality type.

In the classroom I try to instil good listening behaviours and attitudes in the firm belief that doing so opens a whole new paradigm of human experience, joy and discovery that is there for everyone, not an elite ‘musical’ few.  From nursery onwards, I ask the children to sit still and let their ears do the work. I also ask them to hold their thoughts about the music in their heads until the end, when we will share them.  Whilst reacting physically to the music (for example jiggling around to the beat) seems like a natural childlike behaviour, my observation is that it is a behaviour found mainly in the more gregarious personality types, and that their response to the music is distracting to the quieter types. Indeed their communication about what they feel about the music will tend to override what another child feels, as they start to join in the lead-child’s behaviour rather than reacting to the music itself. I ask myself whether a physical response is in some cases learned (we praise children obliquely ‘look how s/he’s enjoying the music’) and I have also noticed that the type of movement is rarely modified to the type of music.  Yes, movement to music is a useful skill and there is a place to practice and encourage it, but in a world where we very rarely give ourselves up to the pleasure of auditory input alone, I think there is a definite case for showing children how keeping still and just being with the music brings a very real pleasure.

Obviously as children grow, their ability to listen to longer pieces of music intently also grows, but another thing I have learnt during my time at Cargilfield is how easy it would be to underestimate children.  Vivaldi’s ‘Four Seasons’, one concerto at a time, for example, work well for P1 in the Summer term, and they enjoy responding through art work whilst listening a second and third time. P1 recently amazed me with their enjoyment of a 20-minute version of the Carnival of the Animals and were able to tell me all about their favourite bits by the end.  There was a bit of fidgeting and yawning in the slower sections (for example the Tortoises), but then some of the fidgeters told me that these were their favourite animals. The lesson taught me, once again, to trust the music – there’s a reason why the famous classics are famous classics – they just are really good and we don’t need to mediate between the music and the children or apologise for asking for their attention.

rightColBody

In the older classes, where good listening behaviours have generally been learnt, attitudes to music play an important part.  Here I see my role as one of showing the children what is out there and why it is interesting; I always stress that it is up to them to like or dislike the music, but they should be able to say why, so we practice discussing the music, gradually introducing more technical language, since it is often the vocabulary that can make music seem a closed book to those not initiated into its mysteries. By Form 6, children have developed musical likes and dislikes that, like clothing styles, reflect their developing sense of self.  My job is to stop these from becoming restricting.  Just because you really like dogs, doesn’t mean that, when you go to the zoo, you go around sulking because there are no dogs there; you can like dogs best but still find elephants and giraffes and iguanas interesting.  In the same way, there is no limit to the music that you can listen to, but it does help to know a bit about the background of the piece so that you can understand why it is the way it is. (I’m not that keen on ants, but finding out more about them certainly makes you admire them!)

Changes to the technology of how we consume music in the last 20 years have opened up so many opportunities. I do have a small regret that the opportunity to ‘gift’ music, in the way that I was given tapes and CDs, seems to have gone.  Those first 5 tapes I was given when I got my own tape player aged 9 had a completely transformative effect on my life, and I would have enjoyed giving my nieces and nephews music ‘packaged’ in that way. However, set against this the availability of quality live performances on demand both in the classroom and at home, where Youtube, Spotify and other platforms open up such an enormous library to everyone.  Here is a wonderful opportunity for children to go on a personal voyage of discovery, indeed, the that fact that such programmes will suggest music based on what you have been listening to can make it difficult to stop at times!  

May I wish you happy listening over the Easter holidays?

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perch_introTextAn important skill to acquire
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Listening to music – is that even a skill?  Surely everyone can listen? Surely it’s natural to enjoy music? Or maybe it’s just something that musical people do?

The more I teach and observe young children interacting with recorded or live music, the more I realise that there is a lot more to it than that. I am no psychologist, so this may not be the correct terminology, but it seems to me that listening to music is a cultural behaviour that quite definitely does need teaching. Yes, there are definitely those who from a very young age seem particularly transfixed by musical performances, but not being one of those people doesn’t seem to relate to a lack of musical ability at a later age – just a different personality type.

In the classroom I try to instil good listening behaviours and attitudes in the firm belief that doing so opens a whole new paradigm of human experience, joy and discovery that is there for everyone, not an elite ‘musical’ few.  From nursery onwards, I ask the children to sit still and let their ears do the work. I also ask them to hold their thoughts about the music in their heads until the end, when we will share them.  Whilst reacting physically to the music (for example jiggling around to the beat) seems like a natural childlike behaviour, my observation is that it is a behaviour found mainly in the more gregarious personality types, and that their response to the music is distracting to the quieter types. Indeed their communication about what they feel about the music will tend to override what another child feels, as they start to join in the lead-child’s behaviour rather than reacting to the music itself. I ask myself whether a physical response is in some cases learned (we praise children obliquely ‘look how s/he’s enjoying the music’) and I have also noticed that the type of movement is rarely modified to the type of music.  Yes, movement to music is a useful skill and there is a place to practice and encourage it, but in a world where we very rarely give ourselves up to the pleasure of auditory input alone, I think there is a definite case for showing children how keeping still and just being with the music brings a very real pleasure.

Obviously as children grow, their ability to listen to longer pieces of music intently also grows, but another thing I have learnt during my time at Cargilfield is how easy it would be to underestimate children.  Vivaldi’s ‘Four Seasons’, one concerto at a time, for example, work well for P1 in the Summer term, and they enjoy responding through art work whilst listening a second and third time. P1 recently amazed me with their enjoyment of a 20-minute version of the Carnival of the Animals and were able to tell me all about their favourite bits by the end.  There was a bit of fidgeting and yawning in the slower sections (for example the Tortoises), but then some of the fidgeters told me that these were their favourite animals. The lesson taught me, once again, to trust the music – there’s a reason why the famous classics are famous classics – they just are really good and we don’t need to mediate between the music and the children or apologise for asking for their attention.

perch_rightColBody

In the older classes, where good listening behaviours have generally been learnt, attitudes to music play an important part.  Here I see my role as one of showing the children what is out there and why it is interesting; I always stress that it is up to them to like or dislike the music, but they should be able to say why, so we practice discussing the music, gradually introducing more technical language, since it is often the vocabulary that can make music seem a closed book to those not initiated into its mysteries. By Form 6, children have developed musical likes and dislikes that, like clothing styles, reflect their developing sense of self.  My job is to stop these from becoming restricting.  Just because you really like dogs, doesn’t mean that, when you go to the zoo, you go around sulking because there are no dogs there; you can like dogs best but still find elephants and giraffes and iguanas interesting.  In the same way, there is no limit to the music that you can listen to, but it does help to know a bit about the background of the piece so that you can understand why it is the way it is. (I’m not that keen on ants, but finding out more about them certainly makes you admire them!)

Changes to the technology of how we consume music in the last 20 years have opened up so many opportunities. I do have a small regret that the opportunity to ‘gift’ music, in the way that I was given tapes and CDs, seems to have gone.  Those first 5 tapes I was given when I got my own tape player aged 9 had a completely transformative effect on my life, and I would have enjoyed giving my nieces and nephews music ‘packaged’ in that way. However, set against this the availability of quality live performances on demand both in the classroom and at home, where Youtube, Spotify and other platforms open up such an enormous library to everyone.  Here is a wonderful opportunity for children to go on a personal voyage of discovery, indeed, the that fact that such programmes will suggest music based on what you have been listening to can make it difficult to stop at times!  

May I wish you happy listening over the Easter holidays?

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Cargilfield

Learning to Listen

An important skill to acquire

Read More


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Hello everyone, some of you may not know who I am so my name is Heather Thomson and I have been a matron for 30 years in various schools up and down the country. Here at Cargilfield I look after a wing full of lovely girls between the ages of 7 and 13. Believe it or not a lot of people who have not worked in a boarding school don’t have a clue what a matron is and what their specific role is…Well now I am going to give you a sneaky insight into what I do.

My day starts at 6:20am, that’s the time I wake up, it’s lovely in the summer with the glorious sunrise over my flat however in the winter it is a little trickier. I go around my boarding wing at about 7:10am and wake the girls up, the radio blares and often the girls are woken up to me singing!  The younger ones jump straight out of bed but the older ones need a prod. We all attend breakfast at 7:30am and join the boys.

At about 8:00am I will go around my boarding wing and make sure that the girls have done the regular things of making their beds, brushing their teeth etc. At 8.20 I am in the laundry room sorting the boys and girls laundry and ironing shirts.

The rest of my day varies. I spend some time sorting the boys (for whom I am also responsible for along side the Housemaster) and girls’ dormitories. I am also responsible for checking the registers and following up on children who are not in school, sorting out any flexi boarders and booking children in for weekends. Plus the inevitable emails that need responding too.

I usually have a bit of time to myself over lunch and I enjoy making cakes for the staff to enjoy or at the end of term for the boarders.

rightColBody

The afternoons are spent in the changing rooms and catching up on anything I didn’t have time to do in the morning. On Wednesdays from 2:00pm until 4:00pm on match days, my day is spent on the games field, summer is fabulous, winter…cold.  I also get called to help with medical issues if the nurse is off duty.

My favourite part of the day is the evenings. After supper and clubs the girls come up to the boarding wing we have a good old chat about the day, there are lots of laughs and giggles but  it’s also a great time to also hear if they are worried or concerned about anything.  I read a story to the younger girls before lights out and the older ones just to want to chat. Lights out start at 8.40pm for the young ones and finish at 9.10pm for the seniors. It’s amazing that just as you are about to switch the lights out the girls will ask you questions (yep a little extra time of the light being on). Once all the lights are out and the girls settled, the gap student takes over which is about 9.20pm, I get to go to my flat, by this time I am a little tired. I do now have a bit down time, until 10.00pm, often catching up on a bit of Netflix watching, but you are always on your toes in case the bell goes off overnight for anyone who is unwell or upset, thankfully this doesn’t happen too often (famous last words!)

There you have it, the mysterious job of a Matron…Of course this isn’t all of it. There isn’t a day that goes by where there isn’t an entertaining moment but you will have to wait a little to read those. This job is unique and unsual but very rewarding and most of the time I love it! until next time, this matron has lots of jobs to do.

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Hello everyone, some of you may not know who I am so my name is Heather Thomson and I have been a matron for 30 years in various schools up and down the country. Here at Cargilfield I look after a wing full of lovely girls between the ages of 7 and 13. Believe it or not a lot of people who have not worked in a boarding school don’t have a clue what a matron is and what their specific role is…Well now I am going to give you a sneaky insight into what I do.

My day starts at 6:20am, that’s the time I wake up, it’s lovely in the summer with the glorious sunrise over my flat however in the winter it is a little trickier. I go around my boarding wing at about 7:10am and wake the girls up, the radio blares and often the girls are woken up to me singing!  The younger ones jump straight out of bed but the older ones need a prod. We all attend breakfast at 7:30am and join the boys.

At about 8:00am I will go around my boarding wing and make sure that the girls have done the regular things of making their beds, brushing their teeth etc. At 8.20 I am in the laundry room sorting the boys and girls laundry and ironing shirts.

The rest of my day varies. I spend some time sorting the boys (for whom I am also responsible for along side the Housemaster) and girls’ dormitories. I am also responsible for checking the registers and following up on children who are not in school, sorting out any flexi boarders and booking children in for weekends. Plus the inevitable emails that need responding too.

I usually have a bit of time to myself over lunch and I enjoy making cakes for the staff to enjoy or at the end of term for the boarders.

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The afternoons are spent in the changing rooms and catching up on anything I didn’t have time to do in the morning. On Wednesdays from 2:00pm until 4:00pm on match days, my day is spent on the games field, summer is fabulous, winter…cold.  I also get called to help with medical issues if the nurse is off duty.

My favourite part of the day is the evenings. After supper and clubs the girls come up to the boarding wing we have a good old chat about the day, there are lots of laughs and giggles but  it’s also a great time to also hear if they are worried or concerned about anything.  I read a story to the younger girls before lights out and the older ones just to want to chat. Lights out start at 8.40pm for the young ones and finish at 9.10pm for the seniors. It’s amazing that just as you are about to switch the lights out the girls will ask you questions (yep a little extra time of the light being on). Once all the lights are out and the girls settled, the gap student takes over which is about 9.20pm, I get to go to my flat, by this time I am a little tired. I do now have a bit down time, until 10.00pm, often catching up on a bit of Netflix watching, but you are always on your toes in case the bell goes off overnight for anyone who is unwell or upset, thankfully this doesn’t happen too often (famous last words!)

There you have it, the mysterious job of a Matron…Of course this isn’t all of it. There isn’t a day that goes by where there isn’t an entertaining moment but you will have to wait a little to read those. This job is unique and unsual but very rewarding and most of the time I love it! until next time, this matron has lots of jobs to do.

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Cargilfield

A Matron's life.....

….is a very varied one!

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Having been back in the classroom again after a few years of not being a full time teacher, it has made me reflect on the teaching of children and why the prep school experience is such a fantastic environment for children to grow up in.

A long time ago I went to a talk where a visiting speaker described a child’s brain as containing a series of elastic bands. If each elastic band represents different skills and experiences then some of those elastic bands will be more stretched than others. For example, if a child is good at maths or reading then those particular bands will be stretched more than say the bands representing writing or sport. When a child is good at something, the temptation, as a teacher or a parent, is to keep stretching that particular elastic band by giving more exposure to that skill. Whilst it’s important to do that, the down side is that the other bands will be left unstretched or not used at all.

The beauty of a prep school, particularly as the children get older, is that they have a number of opportunities to try different subjects and to take part in different activities where they are being challenged and more importantly are learning resilience and managing their mistakes. The trick as a teacher is to make sure that a child’s strengths are maintained but that other experiences and subjects are given as much time to enable your child to have as many of those bands stretched as possible. Hopefully, by the time they are ready to leave Cargilfield, a good many of those elastic bands will have been stretched. In the process, many children will discover that they have a strength that they never knew existed!

Sarah Taylor

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perch_introTextBreadth of opportunity at Prep School
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Having been back in the classroom again after a few years of not being a full time teacher, it has made me reflect on the teaching of children and why the prep school experience is such a fantastic environment for children to grow up in.

A long time ago I went to a talk where a visiting speaker described a child’s brain as containing a series of elastic bands. If each elastic band represents different skills and experiences then some of those elastic bands will be more stretched than others. For example, if a child is good at maths or reading then those particular bands will be stretched more than say the bands representing writing or sport. When a child is good at something, the temptation, as a teacher or a parent, is to keep stretching that particular elastic band by giving more exposure to that skill. Whilst it’s important to do that, the down side is that the other bands will be left unstretched or not used at all.

The beauty of a prep school, particularly as the children get older, is that they have a number of opportunities to try different subjects and to take part in different activities where they are being challenged and more importantly are learning resilience and managing their mistakes. The trick as a teacher is to make sure that a child’s strengths are maintained but that other experiences and subjects are given as much time to enable your child to have as many of those bands stretched as possible. Hopefully, by the time they are ready to leave Cargilfield, a good many of those elastic bands will have been stretched. In the process, many children will discover that they have a strength that they never knew existed!

Sarah Taylor

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Cargilfield

Stretch those elastic bands!

Breadth of opportunity at Prep School

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Posted on

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perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextHelping children achieve their potential
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If a child is experiencing any kind of difficulty in school, it can be a worrying time for parents. Concerns about progress in learning should be discussed with Form Tutors in the first instance; Form Tutors may then seek advice from the Support for Learning Department. In many cases, appropriate support can be put in place to help a child to overcome their difficulties.

Barriers to learning can be experienced for many reasons so if a child’s difficulties persist, then the next step may be to seek advice from an Educational Psychologist. Educational Psychologists have training in child development and how children learn and process information, alongside an in-depth knowledge of the education system. They are able to carry out testing to assess any difficulties and identify strengths, then offer advice based upon their findings.

The best outcomes for a child’s learning are achieved when parents, school staff and any outside agencies work closely together; for this reason, Educational Psychology assessments should be arranged through school. An approved Educational Psychologist is then able to come into school at an agreed time, observe the child in their normal place of learning and gather information by speaking directly to teachers and looking at classwork. The procedure at Cargilfield is as follows:

  •    With parents’ consent, the Support for Learning Department contacts an approved Educational Psychologist to arrange an assessment.
  •    Prior to the assessment, with parents’ agreement, school sends relevant background information and any existing assessments to the Educational Psychologist for review.
  •        In school, the Educational Psychologist speaks to the child to get their views on what is going well or is difficult, liaises with staff and looks at classwork. They are trained in putting children at ease and making the experience as enjoyable as possible. The assessment is conducted over the course of a morning and is followed by a meeting with parents and Support for Learning staff to discuss findings.
  •        A full written report is produced by the Educational Psychologist, detailing findings and recommendations (for example, teaching strategies and resources). Referrals to other professionals may be recommended and suggestions for access arrangements in examinations will be included if appropriate.

The information gathered from an assessment often proves to be invaluable in supporting a child in their learning and helping them to achieve their full potential.

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If a child is experiencing any kind of difficulty in school, it can be a worrying time for parents. Concerns about progress in learning should be discussed with Form Tutors in the first instance; Form Tutors may then seek advice from the Support for Learning Department. In many cases, appropriate support can be put in place to help a child to overcome their difficulties.

Barriers to learning can be experienced for many reasons so if a child’s difficulties persist, then the next step may be to seek advice from an Educational Psychologist. Educational Psychologists have training in child development and how children learn and process information, alongside an in-depth knowledge of the education system. They are able to carry out testing to assess any difficulties and identify strengths, then offer advice based upon their findings.

The best outcomes for a child’s learning are achieved when parents, school staff and any outside agencies work closely together; for this reason, Educational Psychology assessments should be arranged through school. An approved Educational Psychologist is then able to come into school at an agreed time, observe the child in their normal place of learning and gather information by speaking directly to teachers and looking at classwork. The procedure at Cargilfield is as follows:

  •    With parents’ consent, the Support for Learning Department contacts an approved Educational Psychologist to arrange an assessment.
  •    Prior to the assessment, with parents’ agreement, school sends relevant background information and any existing assessments to the Educational Psychologist for review.
  •        In school, the Educational Psychologist speaks to the child to get their views on what is going well or is difficult, liaises with staff and looks at classwork. They are trained in putting children at ease and making the experience as enjoyable as possible. The assessment is conducted over the course of a morning and is followed by a meeting with parents and Support for Learning staff to discuss findings.
  •        A full written report is produced by the Educational Psychologist, detailing findings and recommendations (for example, teaching strategies and resources). Referrals to other professionals may be recommended and suggestions for access arrangements in examinations will be included if appropriate.

The information gathered from an assessment often proves to be invaluable in supporting a child in their learning and helping them to achieve their full potential.

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The role of the Educational Psychologist

Helping children achieve their potential

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introTextThe eco revolution at Cargilfield
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"The Eco-Schools programme engages children and young people in key issues including the environment, sustainability, global citizenship and the value of a low carbon future." (Eco Schools 2019)

Cargilfield are part of the Eco Schools programme and are working hard to gain Green Flag status. The Eco-Schools programme has been engaging young people in taking positive actions that transform their lives. From its beginnings in a few European countries, the programme has expanded to effect change in some 59,000 schools in 68 countries across the globe. There has been a lot of overall eco-enthusiasm of pupils and staff throughout Cargilfield. We look forward to plans and developments unravelling throughout the school year.

The Upper School Eco Committee felt the recycling bins should be a focus so these have been implemented in the main foyer and will be in the Pre Prep after half term too. At Eco Club, children have been busy creating helpful posters as reminders of how to help improve the environment. They are looking at putting a paper bin in each classroom too. The next plan is to look at the location of the bins and look at how waste is disposed of offsite. The Pre-Prep are very excited to create an eco-club and receive their eco badges after half term. The Nursery have been picking up litter and growing their own vegetables too. There is definitely a green air around school!

Children are the future of our planet, so instilling good environmental practice in them is key. What have you recycled today?

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perch_introTextThe eco revolution at Cargilfield
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"The Eco-Schools programme engages children and young people in key issues including the environment, sustainability, global citizenship and the value of a low carbon future." (Eco Schools 2019)

Cargilfield are part of the Eco Schools programme and are working hard to gain Green Flag status. The Eco-Schools programme has been engaging young people in taking positive actions that transform their lives. From its beginnings in a few European countries, the programme has expanded to effect change in some 59,000 schools in 68 countries across the globe. There has been a lot of overall eco-enthusiasm of pupils and staff throughout Cargilfield. We look forward to plans and developments unravelling throughout the school year.

The Upper School Eco Committee felt the recycling bins should be a focus so these have been implemented in the main foyer and will be in the Pre Prep after half term too. At Eco Club, children have been busy creating helpful posters as reminders of how to help improve the environment. They are looking at putting a paper bin in each classroom too. The next plan is to look at the location of the bins and look at how waste is disposed of offsite. The Pre-Prep are very excited to create an eco-club and receive their eco badges after half term. The Nursery have been picking up litter and growing their own vegetables too. There is definitely a green air around school!

Children are the future of our planet, so instilling good environmental practice in them is key. What have you recycled today?

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Cargilfield

Keep Calm and Go Green

The eco revolution at Cargilfield

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introTextThe golden rule at Cargilfield
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The children in the Pre-Prep at Cargilfield love it when Mr Taylor pops in for an assembly and mentions his three school rules. Everyone from Primary One to Primary Three choruses Rule 1-Be kind, Rule 2-Be kind, Rule 3-Be kind. 

For teachers of young children there are few more important rules to teach to any age of child. 

Be kind to the other children in your class. You will make more friends if you behave like this and you will feel really good about yourself. 

Be kind to other children in school including brothers and sisters! Treat other children the way you would like to be treated yourself. 

Be kind to adults who work in school. Be polite, friendly and helpful to grown ups who work with you and you will find life will go more smoothly. 

Be kind to mum and dad. You love them, so show it with your behaviour to them. Try to do what they ask you to do and see if there is anything you could do to help them to make their life easier. Just give them a hug now and again!

Be kind to yourself. Get enough sleep, don’t spend too much time online, eat healthily and play outside often. 

For teachers of young children there are few more important rules to stick to when working with any age of child. This doesn’t mean spoiling the children or excusing unpleasant behaviour, but dealing with issues and talking them through instead of just reprimanding pupils when things go wrong. Children usually misbehave for a reason, whether it is boredom, frustration, reacting to another’s behaviour towards them or just waking up in a bad mood. 

Be kind to the children in your class. Body language, tone of voice and eye contact are so important to demonstrate to the children that you are really listening to them and that what they say and think really matters to you. They may be young, but they can tell if you are really fully engaged in their communication. Greeting them in the mornings and having an individual conversation makes them feel an instant connection each day.

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Be kind to the children you come into contact with each day. In the same way engage with other children in the school, comment positively on behaviour, uniform etc and develop a positive relationship with others. If you can’t say something positive try to use constructive criticism. 

Be kind to your colleagues and ancillary staff. However busy you are, make the time to socialise at some point in your working day. Find out a little about your colleagues so that you understand what they are dealing with when they leave school each day –young children, older relatives, medical issues or financial problems. 

Be kind to the parents of children in your care. Be understanding if they are grumpy or have forgotten their child’s kit and homework for the third time that week. They may be juggling other children, stressful times at work or difficult emotional issues. Keep them informed of school events coming up and give them honest feedback about their child regularly making sure they are aware of day to day activities in class. 

Be kind to yourself. Make sure you have time for yourself and have life outside school. Whether you choose to pamper yourself at a spa, push yourself physically with sport or exercise, singing in a choir, playing in an orchestra, watching a movie, climbing a hill, reading a bestseller, having a great meal, knitting a jumper or retail therapy. It makes such a difference if the teacher comes in fresh each day with a positive response to their day in the classroom. 

Leading by example is essential of course-be kind, be kind, be kind. 

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perch_introTextThe golden rule at Cargilfield
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The children in the Pre-Prep at Cargilfield love it when Mr Taylor pops in for an assembly and mentions his three school rules. Everyone from Primary One to Primary Three choruses Rule 1-Be kind, Rule 2-Be kind, Rule 3-Be kind. 

For teachers of young children there are few more important rules to teach to any age of child. 

Be kind to the other children in your class. You will make more friends if you behave like this and you will feel really good about yourself. 

Be kind to other children in school including brothers and sisters! Treat other children the way you would like to be treated yourself. 

Be kind to adults who work in school. Be polite, friendly and helpful to grown ups who work with you and you will find life will go more smoothly. 

Be kind to mum and dad. You love them, so show it with your behaviour to them. Try to do what they ask you to do and see if there is anything you could do to help them to make their life easier. Just give them a hug now and again!

Be kind to yourself. Get enough sleep, don’t spend too much time online, eat healthily and play outside often. 

For teachers of young children there are few more important rules to stick to when working with any age of child. This doesn’t mean spoiling the children or excusing unpleasant behaviour, but dealing with issues and talking them through instead of just reprimanding pupils when things go wrong. Children usually misbehave for a reason, whether it is boredom, frustration, reacting to another’s behaviour towards them or just waking up in a bad mood. 

Be kind to the children in your class. Body language, tone of voice and eye contact are so important to demonstrate to the children that you are really listening to them and that what they say and think really matters to you. They may be young, but they can tell if you are really fully engaged in their communication. Greeting them in the mornings and having an individual conversation makes them feel an instant connection each day.

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Be kind to the children you come into contact with each day. In the same way engage with other children in the school, comment positively on behaviour, uniform etc and develop a positive relationship with others. If you can’t say something positive try to use constructive criticism. 

Be kind to your colleagues and ancillary staff. However busy you are, make the time to socialise at some point in your working day. Find out a little about your colleagues so that you understand what they are dealing with when they leave school each day –young children, older relatives, medical issues or financial problems. 

Be kind to the parents of children in your care. Be understanding if they are grumpy or have forgotten their child’s kit and homework for the third time that week. They may be juggling other children, stressful times at work or difficult emotional issues. Keep them informed of school events coming up and give them honest feedback about their child regularly making sure they are aware of day to day activities in class. 

Be kind to yourself. Make sure you have time for yourself and have life outside school. Whether you choose to pamper yourself at a spa, push yourself physically with sport or exercise, singing in a choir, playing in an orchestra, watching a movie, climbing a hill, reading a bestseller, having a great meal, knitting a jumper or retail therapy. It makes such a difference if the teacher comes in fresh each day with a positive response to their day in the classroom. 

Leading by example is essential of course-be kind, be kind, be kind. 

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Cargilfield

Importance of being kind!

The golden rule at Cargilfield

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perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
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Oh no! He is on about his maps again….

Following on from the success of using Digital Maps in the classroom last year, the website took off and has become so much more! 

The project has evolved into a crusade to broaden my pupils’ understanding of the Ancient World; from learning about Greek myths, dabbling in some Egyptian Hieroglyphs or finding a new book to read. 

As we know, the Common Entrance and Scholarship syllabi are grammar orientated but do provide wonderful and fascinating stories for the candidates to translate based on Greek mythology or historical events from the Roman Empire. By having a good understanding of these myths and historical events, the candidates will find tricky translations much easier and less likely to panic or give up by knowing the story behind it.

The Greek Mythology section has detailed accounts of the major gods and goddesses and the myths that surround them, which is a good starting point for anyone interested in the Ancient World.

This can also be combined with the Recommended Reading, which provides pupils with an extended reading list of books based of Greek Mythology and the Roman Empire, combining a passion for reading and learning. Other recommendations include TV & Film and Video Games.

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Pupils can also access all of the resources that they will need for Common Entrance in the Languages section under Latin and Ancient Greek, as well as the Revision section of the School website.

The use of social media has also be implemented in conjunction with the website to promote the resources available to a wider audience in general and of School Classics departments. It has been a useful tool to network with other Classics teachers from the UK and abroad to share ideas and resources for the betterment of our students. It has also been useful CPD; engaging with Academics and Authors on their work for a better understanding of Ancient History and Classics.

This is all accessible on the website: www.digitalmapsoftheancientworld.com so that pupils can explore in their own time.

ROF

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perch_introTextBroadening understanding of the Ancient World
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Oh no! He is on about his maps again….

Following on from the success of using Digital Maps in the classroom last year, the website took off and has become so much more! 

The project has evolved into a crusade to broaden my pupils’ understanding of the Ancient World; from learning about Greek myths, dabbling in some Egyptian Hieroglyphs or finding a new book to read. 

As we know, the Common Entrance and Scholarship syllabi are grammar orientated but do provide wonderful and fascinating stories for the candidates to translate based on Greek mythology or historical events from the Roman Empire. By having a good understanding of these myths and historical events, the candidates will find tricky translations much easier and less likely to panic or give up by knowing the story behind it.

The Greek Mythology section has detailed accounts of the major gods and goddesses and the myths that surround them, which is a good starting point for anyone interested in the Ancient World.

This can also be combined with the Recommended Reading, which provides pupils with an extended reading list of books based of Greek Mythology and the Roman Empire, combining a passion for reading and learning. Other recommendations include TV & Film and Video Games.

Image

perch_rightColBody

Image

Pupils can also access all of the resources that they will need for Common Entrance in the Languages section under Latin and Ancient Greek, as well as the Revision section of the School website.

The use of social media has also be implemented in conjunction with the website to promote the resources available to a wider audience in general and of School Classics departments. It has been a useful tool to network with other Classics teachers from the UK and abroad to share ideas and resources for the betterment of our students. It has also been useful CPD; engaging with Academics and Authors on their work for a better understanding of Ancient History and Classics.

This is all accessible on the website: www.digitalmapsoftheancientworld.com so that pupils can explore in their own time.

ROF

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Cargilfield

Digital Maps of the Ancient World

Broadening understanding of the Ancient World

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Why do we have to go to chapel if we’re not religious?

A comment I have heard many a time.  On the face of it, one could simply agree.  However, going to chapel is so much more than a place of prayer and worship.  It is a coming together of a community to be in a place of calm where one can reflect and have some time to think.  Yes, in our morning chapel time we have a reading and a prayer but one can take out of that what they wish.  The readings are often based around a story that has a moral, and whether the listener is religious or not, I would like to think they would aspire to be a moral and sensitive-to-others kind of person.  

But as I have said, going to chapel is so much more.  On a practical note, messages and announcements are made, it is a place to celebrate achievements, listen to musical treats of all kinds, from classical to pop, organs to rock guitars and drums, not to mention the fantastic plays that are put on regularly; and all in the beautiful and historic surroundings, complete with roaring fires and a beautiful Christmas tree in December.

Finally, why else do we go to chapel?  Because to do so reminds us of all those who braved the wars and fought for our country and freedom.  It is a poignant reminder of what we have now and to appreciate the goodness in our lives.  So, if your child isn’t religious but finds themselves still at chapel, please encourage them take in the surroundings and value what they have.

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Why do we have to go to chapel if we’re not religious?

A comment I have heard many a time.  On the face of it, one could simply agree.  However, going to chapel is so much more than a place of prayer and worship.  It is a coming together of a community to be in a place of calm where one can reflect and have some time to think.  Yes, in our morning chapel time we have a reading and a prayer but one can take out of that what they wish.  The readings are often based around a story that has a moral, and whether the listener is religious or not, I would like to think they would aspire to be a moral and sensitive-to-others kind of person.  

But as I have said, going to chapel is so much more.  On a practical note, messages and announcements are made, it is a place to celebrate achievements, listen to musical treats of all kinds, from classical to pop, organs to rock guitars and drums, not to mention the fantastic plays that are put on regularly; and all in the beautiful and historic surroundings, complete with roaring fires and a beautiful Christmas tree in December.

Finally, why else do we go to chapel?  Because to do so reminds us of all those who braved the wars and fought for our country and freedom.  It is a poignant reminder of what we have now and to appreciate the goodness in our lives.  So, if your child isn’t religious but finds themselves still at chapel, please encourage them take in the surroundings and value what they have.

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Why do we have to go to chapel if we’re not religious?

Chapel at the heart of the school

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Cargilfield Connected

We can’t welcome you to our grounds right now, but we hope that this video, presented by our Headmaster, Mr Rob Taylor, will give you a flavour of what life is like here at Cargilfield.

We have places available for 2020 entry in most year groups.

Our website and social media channels are being kept up to date and hold a wealth of information about our school. We hope these give you a flavour of what life is like here at Cargilfield.

Our Registrar, Fiona Craig is available to contact via email: registrar@cargilfield.com and she will be happy to help.

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