Archive of: June, 2019

Archive

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextOur job as educators is to provide opportunities for lots of sport!
image/cms/resources/5448b0fe-9e0a-4e18-89db-9a6e2e3f2480.jpeg
imageAltCargilfield
leftColBody

IMG 4410

Sport plays a large part in all children’s daily life here at Cargilfield. We play sport every afternoon, we have sporting clubs every break time and after supper every evening, we have competitive inter school matches every Wednesday afternoon and often at weekends, and we take part in national competitions, playing in Finals as far away as Somerset and Bristol. We consider sport a vital part in the children’s education development here, aiming for excellence where possible but also striving to provide competitive opportunities for all children to take part, to improve, and most importantly to enjoy their sport at whatever level they play.

Like academic work, children’s sporting talent and enthusiasm develop at different speeds, so we try to adopt a ‘Sport for All’ policy as well as trying to aim for excellence and provide our talented athletes with pathways which may well lead on to district or national representation. Just as children become bored if not stretched academically, the same applies on the sports field and it is always a difficult balancing act, providing opportunities for all to take part as well as challenging the more able and finding top quality opposition against whom we can test ourselves.  At Cargilfield, we have nurtured full international amateur golfers, cricket, rugby and hockey players over the past twenty years, but have also engendered a love of sport, we hope, in so many more children which they will take on in to adulthood, long after they have moved on from here.

However, just how hard should we push our children? When should children specialise and focus on just one sport? Or is it our job as teachers and parents to expose children to as many different sports as possible to engender a love of physical activity and exercise? Many parents will be aware or have heard of the 10,000 hour rule publicised by Malcolm Gladwell, and which often appears in the media when discussing talented athletes. The principle holds that 10,000 hours of “deliberate practice” are needed to become world-class in any field whether it is in music, business, art or sport.

As well as the 10,000 hour rule the media coverage of the road to success for Tiger Woods in golf and the Williams sisters in tennis who spent a large part of their childhood practising and specialising in one sport has been seen by many parents as the blueprint to success. However, for all the success of Woods and the Williams sisters there will have been thousands of failures attempting the above model – the only difference is that we do not know anything about it!

Long term athletic development requires far more components than just deliberate practice. Two of the biggest issues evolving from the 10,000 hour rule are single sport specialisation and the push for early selection to elite sporting programmes run by National Governing Bodies such as the SRU, Scottish Hockey, the FA and British Swimming amongst others.

Many parents now feel the need to get their child to 10,000 hours as soon as possible and to do this will ultimately mean focussing the vast majority of time and money playing and practising just one sport as opposed to experiencing a wide range of activities. This can rob them of their childhood and many children do not find the sport they would have enjoyed the most and become the most successful at.

Single sport specialisation at an early age can lead to problems such as burnout, injury, lack of motivation and also psychological issues yet parents often cannot see beyond the initial short term success in helping their children achieve the best from their sport.

Porter cash

rightColBody

HH52GRZ36VEZHOQ6LYN6RJO5KU

Sport should be a lifelong, long term investment for any child and any parent. The fact still remains that although there may be exceptions many top level sportsmen and women sampled a variety of sports during their early years and only in their teenage years did they really begin to specialise and focus on one specific sport.

The next issue for parents is that they are pushing and being pushed for their children to get selected into elite sports programmes at a younger age fearing that if they do not do it immediately they will struggle to get there in the future. In the UK perhaps football poses the biggest problem for parents due to its early selection criteria. With the offering of contracts by professional football clubs at the age of 9 many parents have been caught in a rat race thinking that the initial offering of a contract will give them the best chance of creating a professional footballer.

Going back a generation footballers were not invited into the professional football clubs until their early teenage years yet now clubs are picking up children into development programmes as young as the age of 5. In the years that children should be sampling a large majority of sports children are playing football all year round and even at the end of the season when the summer gives them the opportunity to recover and refresh many are involved in summer tournaments most weekends in the pursuit of recognition from the professional clubs.

Professional sportsmen and women have some time off each year to recuperate and do something different yet many parents are finding it acceptable to flog their young children all year round in the pursuit of success, yet the chances of ever ‘making it’ as a top class professional is miniscule. There are lots of sports which have started to select and give representative honours at a far earlier age than they did a generation ago adding fuel to the fire that these children may become professionals in the long term and increasing the expectations of parents along the way.

Clearly, it is important that as parents that we can keep a real sense of perspective on our children’s sport.   Why is your child playing? What do you want them to achieve? That does not mean that your child cannot dream of being a professional or indeed you can even think about it but with the statistics of this becoming a reality this expectation must be managed accordingly.

No matter how many hours you practise there is still no guarantee of long term success. Obviously, as with anything hours of practise will lead to improvement but it offers no guarantees in the future. We want children to be involved in sport all of their life so keeping them fresh by letting them try lots of different sports and finding what they truly love will help achieve this. To encourage a life long love of sport, and so experience all the associated benefits, exposure to as many different sports as possible must be the aim.

Fundamentally there is nothing wrong if your child is fortunate enough to be selected in elite sports programmes at a young age. Great facilities, good coaches, playing with good players are all positives but it is the management of this experience that will allow your child to gain the most from it and give your child valuable lessons that they can take into all aspects of life with them.

More important than anything else is that we must make sure that they are enjoying their sporting experience, and not us as parents or teachers! Unless children enjoy their sport, there will come a time where they will simply stop and walk away no matter how good they are……

Something to ponder, as we head off to yet another tennis lesson on a Saturday morning with your little ones in the back of the car!

Scot wal  34 497x405

DM18becks.jpg

signoff
og_title10,000 hour rule – Misunderstood by us all?
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID845
postID845
blogID1
postTitle10,000 hour rule – Misunderstood by us all?
postSlug2019-06-16-10000-hour-rule-misunderstood-by-us-all
postDateTime2019-06-16 17:27:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"Our job as educators is to provide opportunities for lots of{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2019-06-16 17:27:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingfalse
total3
number_of_pages1
total_pages1
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound3
prev_url
next_url
prev_page_number
next_page_number
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=06
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=06
first_pagetrue
last_pagetrue
perch_introTextOur job as educators is to provide opportunities for lots of sport!
perch_image/cms/resources/5448b0fe-9e0a-4e18-89db-9a6e2e3f2480.jpeg
perch_imageAltCargilfield
perch_leftColBody

IMG 4410

Sport plays a large part in all children’s daily life here at Cargilfield. We play sport every afternoon, we have sporting clubs every break time and after supper every evening, we have competitive inter school matches every Wednesday afternoon and often at weekends, and we take part in national competitions, playing in Finals as far away as Somerset and Bristol. We consider sport a vital part in the children’s education development here, aiming for excellence where possible but also striving to provide competitive opportunities for all children to take part, to improve, and most importantly to enjoy their sport at whatever level they play.

Like academic work, children’s sporting talent and enthusiasm develop at different speeds, so we try to adopt a ‘Sport for All’ policy as well as trying to aim for excellence and provide our talented athletes with pathways which may well lead on to district or national representation. Just as children become bored if not stretched academically, the same applies on the sports field and it is always a difficult balancing act, providing opportunities for all to take part as well as challenging the more able and finding top quality opposition against whom we can test ourselves.  At Cargilfield, we have nurtured full international amateur golfers, cricket, rugby and hockey players over the past twenty years, but have also engendered a love of sport, we hope, in so many more children which they will take on in to adulthood, long after they have moved on from here.

However, just how hard should we push our children? When should children specialise and focus on just one sport? Or is it our job as teachers and parents to expose children to as many different sports as possible to engender a love of physical activity and exercise? Many parents will be aware or have heard of the 10,000 hour rule publicised by Malcolm Gladwell, and which often appears in the media when discussing talented athletes. The principle holds that 10,000 hours of “deliberate practice” are needed to become world-class in any field whether it is in music, business, art or sport.

As well as the 10,000 hour rule the media coverage of the road to success for Tiger Woods in golf and the Williams sisters in tennis who spent a large part of their childhood practising and specialising in one sport has been seen by many parents as the blueprint to success. However, for all the success of Woods and the Williams sisters there will have been thousands of failures attempting the above model – the only difference is that we do not know anything about it!

Long term athletic development requires far more components than just deliberate practice. Two of the biggest issues evolving from the 10,000 hour rule are single sport specialisation and the push for early selection to elite sporting programmes run by National Governing Bodies such as the SRU, Scottish Hockey, the FA and British Swimming amongst others.

Many parents now feel the need to get their child to 10,000 hours as soon as possible and to do this will ultimately mean focussing the vast majority of time and money playing and practising just one sport as opposed to experiencing a wide range of activities. This can rob them of their childhood and many children do not find the sport they would have enjoyed the most and become the most successful at.

Single sport specialisation at an early age can lead to problems such as burnout, injury, lack of motivation and also psychological issues yet parents often cannot see beyond the initial short term success in helping their children achieve the best from their sport.

Porter cash

perch_rightColBody

HH52GRZ36VEZHOQ6LYN6RJO5KU

Sport should be a lifelong, long term investment for any child and any parent. The fact still remains that although there may be exceptions many top level sportsmen and women sampled a variety of sports during their early years and only in their teenage years did they really begin to specialise and focus on one specific sport.

The next issue for parents is that they are pushing and being pushed for their children to get selected into elite sports programmes at a younger age fearing that if they do not do it immediately they will struggle to get there in the future. In the UK perhaps football poses the biggest problem for parents due to its early selection criteria. With the offering of contracts by professional football clubs at the age of 9 many parents have been caught in a rat race thinking that the initial offering of a contract will give them the best chance of creating a professional footballer.

Going back a generation footballers were not invited into the professional football clubs until their early teenage years yet now clubs are picking up children into development programmes as young as the age of 5. In the years that children should be sampling a large majority of sports children are playing football all year round and even at the end of the season when the summer gives them the opportunity to recover and refresh many are involved in summer tournaments most weekends in the pursuit of recognition from the professional clubs.

Professional sportsmen and women have some time off each year to recuperate and do something different yet many parents are finding it acceptable to flog their young children all year round in the pursuit of success, yet the chances of ever ‘making it’ as a top class professional is miniscule. There are lots of sports which have started to select and give representative honours at a far earlier age than they did a generation ago adding fuel to the fire that these children may become professionals in the long term and increasing the expectations of parents along the way.

Clearly, it is important that as parents that we can keep a real sense of perspective on our children’s sport.   Why is your child playing? What do you want them to achieve? That does not mean that your child cannot dream of being a professional or indeed you can even think about it but with the statistics of this becoming a reality this expectation must be managed accordingly.

No matter how many hours you practise there is still no guarantee of long term success. Obviously, as with anything hours of practise will lead to improvement but it offers no guarantees in the future. We want children to be involved in sport all of their life so keeping them fresh by letting them try lots of different sports and finding what they truly love will help achieve this. To encourage a life long love of sport, and so experience all the associated benefits, exposure to as many different sports as possible must be the aim.

Fundamentally there is nothing wrong if your child is fortunate enough to be selected in elite sports programmes at a young age. Great facilities, good coaches, playing with good players are all positives but it is the management of this experience that will allow your child to gain the most from it and give your child valuable lessons that they can take into all aspects of life with them.

More important than anything else is that we must make sure that they are enjoying their sporting experience, and not us as parents or teachers! Unless children enjoy their sport, there will come a time where they will simply stop and walk away no matter how good they are……

Something to ponder, as we head off to yet another tennis lesson on a Saturday morning with your little ones in the back of the car!

Scot wal  34 497x405

DM18becks.jpg

perch_signoff
perch_og_title10,000 hour rule – Misunderstood by us all?
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmail[email protected]
authorPostCount1929
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2019-06-16-10000-hour-rule-misunderstood-by-us-all
postURLFullhttp://www.cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2019-06-16-10000-hour-rule-misunderstood-by-us-all
perch_item_firsttrue
perch_item_zero_index0
perch_item_index1
perch_item_rev_index3
perch_item_rev_zero_index2
perch_item_odd
perch_item_count3
perch_index_in_set1
perch_zero_index_in_set0
perch_first_in_settrue
perch_namespaceperch:blog
Cargilfield

10,000 hour rule – Misunderstood by us all?

Our job as educators is to provide opportunities for lots of sport!

Read More


Posted on

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextIs CE still relevant in today’s educational world?
image/cms/resources/ded56e7f-f76f-47a2-bf12-106c36fa6beb.jpeg
imageAltTeaching
leftColBody

While writing in the week that our Form 8s are hunched over their exam desks and tackling this summer’s Common Entrance exams, it seems a good time to reflect on teaching towards CE.

In truth, I haven’t done much CE teaching for a few years and this year has been a refreshing experience and reminder of the quality of these exams. There are demanding comprehension tasks on both a prose passage and a poem supported by an interesting choice of imaginative writing tasks. In addition children are given the choice between writing discursive essays or a response to their reading, both in and out of the classroom. The tasks are challenging and require some sensitive reading and feel for language as well as an ability to write accurately and persuasively. They are a very significant stepping stone towards GCSE exams and present different challenges for a range of abilities. I have enjoyed teaching towards them and I haven’t noticed a significant difference in the level of challenge provided by these and a number of scholarship English papers used by local independent schools.

In a wider context, it is very fashionable to ‘knock’ CE: too much learning, too prescriptive, too repetitive (as I might have suggested, none of those criticisms can be levelled at the English papers). In the hands of nervous or unimaginative teachers, there may be evidence of this – especially with exams in the Humanities.

It is worth remembering, however, that although the idea of CE and a common curriculum and set of examinations to make sense of entrance to independent senior schools was first created in the latter years of Queen Victoria’s reign, criticisms were already being voiced in articles written before the First World War….and these exams have remained.

They remain popular with the major public schools who see them as delivering a rigour and consistent quality that has been lacking in other curricula such as the Early Years Programme or Prep School Baccalaureate. 



rightColBody

The Independent Schools Examination Board that creates the curriculum and exams includes teachers from both prep and senior schools and they create examinations which are carefully trialled and reviewed. These exams are then marked at a child’s chosen senior school allowing for that school to mark to its own standards as best suits their candidates. While moderating grades to achieve consistency is always difficult (comparing grades amongst the children going to different schools never really works) there is something healthy in masking some of this potentially debilitating competition for 13 year olds. Different levels of papers have also allowed schools to differentiate the challenge even further.

What I like best about Common Entrance, however, is the very personal nature of the communication between prep and senior schools. Children are not just candidate numbers and the inevitable exam disasters and ‘off days’ can generally be negotiated. And don’t forget, that an exam system that can turn around results within a week, allowing prep schools to keep meaningful teaching going right up until the midst of the final term, makes very favourable comparison to any of the larger examination systems.

As I watch a row of focused faces and pens hurrying over the papers, I do reflect that I’m rather glad I don’t have to do examinations any more but - having watched one of my own children struggle through CE and then feel amply prepared for the challenges of the public exams he faced three years later – I say ‘Long live Common Entrance!’

signoff
og_titleNot so Common Entrance?
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID704
postID704
blogID1
postTitleNot so Common Entrance?
postSlug2019-06-07-not-so-common-entrance
postDateTime2019-06-07 03:47:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"Is CE still relevant in today\u2019s educational{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2019-06-07 03:47:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingfalse
total3
number_of_pages1
total_pages1
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound3
prev_url
next_url
prev_page_number
next_page_number
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=06
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=06
first_pagetrue
last_pagetrue
perch_introTextIs CE still relevant in today’s educational world?
perch_image/cms/resources/ded56e7f-f76f-47a2-bf12-106c36fa6beb.jpeg
perch_imageAltTeaching
perch_leftColBody

While writing in the week that our Form 8s are hunched over their exam desks and tackling this summer’s Common Entrance exams, it seems a good time to reflect on teaching towards CE.

In truth, I haven’t done much CE teaching for a few years and this year has been a refreshing experience and reminder of the quality of these exams. There are demanding comprehension tasks on both a prose passage and a poem supported by an interesting choice of imaginative writing tasks. In addition children are given the choice between writing discursive essays or a response to their reading, both in and out of the classroom. The tasks are challenging and require some sensitive reading and feel for language as well as an ability to write accurately and persuasively. They are a very significant stepping stone towards GCSE exams and present different challenges for a range of abilities. I have enjoyed teaching towards them and I haven’t noticed a significant difference in the level of challenge provided by these and a number of scholarship English papers used by local independent schools.

In a wider context, it is very fashionable to ‘knock’ CE: too much learning, too prescriptive, too repetitive (as I might have suggested, none of those criticisms can be levelled at the English papers). In the hands of nervous or unimaginative teachers, there may be evidence of this – especially with exams in the Humanities.

It is worth remembering, however, that although the idea of CE and a common curriculum and set of examinations to make sense of entrance to independent senior schools was first created in the latter years of Queen Victoria’s reign, criticisms were already being voiced in articles written before the First World War….and these exams have remained.

They remain popular with the major public schools who see them as delivering a rigour and consistent quality that has been lacking in other curricula such as the Early Years Programme or Prep School Baccalaureate. 



perch_rightColBody

The Independent Schools Examination Board that creates the curriculum and exams includes teachers from both prep and senior schools and they create examinations which are carefully trialled and reviewed. These exams are then marked at a child’s chosen senior school allowing for that school to mark to its own standards as best suits their candidates. While moderating grades to achieve consistency is always difficult (comparing grades amongst the children going to different schools never really works) there is something healthy in masking some of this potentially debilitating competition for 13 year olds. Different levels of papers have also allowed schools to differentiate the challenge even further.

What I like best about Common Entrance, however, is the very personal nature of the communication between prep and senior schools. Children are not just candidate numbers and the inevitable exam disasters and ‘off days’ can generally be negotiated. And don’t forget, that an exam system that can turn around results within a week, allowing prep schools to keep meaningful teaching going right up until the midst of the final term, makes very favourable comparison to any of the larger examination systems.

As I watch a row of focused faces and pens hurrying over the papers, I do reflect that I’m rather glad I don’t have to do examinations any more but - having watched one of my own children struggle through CE and then feel amply prepared for the challenges of the public exams he faced three years later – I say ‘Long live Common Entrance!’

perch_signoff
perch_og_titleNot so Common Entrance?
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmail[email protected]
authorPostCount1929
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2019-06-07-not-so-common-entrance
postURLFullhttp://www.cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2019-06-07-not-so-common-entrance
perch_item_zero_index1
perch_item_index2
perch_item_rev_index2
perch_item_rev_zero_index1
perch_item_oddodd
perch_item_count3
perch_index_in_set2
perch_zero_index_in_set1
perch_namespaceperch:blog
Teaching

Not so Common Entrance?

Is CE still relevant in today’s educational world?

Read More


Posted on

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextA new way to explore the past
image/cms/resources/thumbnailimg0166.jpg
imageAltCargilfield
leftColBody

What is History? What should we be teaching the children in our school? These are questions that we have been discussing as a Department. In Forms 7 and 8 pretty much most of what we do follows the ISEB curriculum as a stepping stone to Common Entrance or Scholarship. However, further down the school we have an opportunity to be more creative about what we teach and the methods we use to engage our children in studying history.

This term we have introduced a new approach to form 5 history. As a department we were determined to stress the role that History has played in our lives today. We are looking to develop important and broadly applicable skills and to promote a lifelong enjoyment of the subject. We are also keen to develop our children’s knowledge of local history and the place of our school in the local community.

Our expectations are high. Our children are routinely challenged to think critically and we have tried this term to weave our historical studies into a cross curricular approach in Form 5. For the first time, we have put the textbooks and pens to one side and are attempting to understand the history of Edinburgh through a study of local history that encompasses some Geography and RS as well.

Thumbnail IMG 0165

5M gate group

rightColBody

As you will see from the photos the children have been looking at the history of Cargilfield. It’s amazing how engaged they have been about this. One of my favourite activities was a re enactment of the opening of the Cargilfield gates at Barnton Avenue West. This week they walked down to Cramond to explore the Roman fort and explore the origins of Christianity on the site. Dr Barr was on hand to talk to them about this and answer their questions about the Kirk.

We have encouraged our children to think deeply about the questions we ask them and to work in pairs and small groups to encourage peer support and discussion and development of ideas. It is early days but our teaching staff believe that the children are highly engaged and enjoying this process. They are able to talk is detail about the things they are studying and enjoy sharing their ideas.

We have some exciting things planned for the rest of term including a trip to The Royal Mile and a visit to Mary King’s Close. For those of you who don’t know, Mary King’s Close is a warren of late medieval streets located under the City Chambers on the Royal Mile. It became buried in the 18th century and lay undisturbed until a few years ago when it was made safe and opened to the public. The children are apparently looking forward to meeting a few of the ghosts who live down there and hearing about their lives.

We would be interested to hear your feedback as we reflect on how to develop this going forward.

Please feel free to get in touch.

AD

Fort 4

signoff
og_titleWhat is History?
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID776
postID776
blogID1
postTitleWhat is History?
postSlug2019-06-01-what-is-history
postDateTime2019-06-01 09:53:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"A new way to explore the past","image":{"assetID":"3827","title":"Thumbnail IMG{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2019-06-01 09:53:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingfalse
total3
number_of_pages1
total_pages1
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound3
prev_url
next_url
prev_page_number
next_page_number
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=06
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=06
first_pagetrue
last_pagetrue
perch_introTextA new way to explore the past
perch_image/cms/resources/thumbnailimg0166.jpg
perch_imageAltCargilfield
perch_leftColBody

What is History? What should we be teaching the children in our school? These are questions that we have been discussing as a Department. In Forms 7 and 8 pretty much most of what we do follows the ISEB curriculum as a stepping stone to Common Entrance or Scholarship. However, further down the school we have an opportunity to be more creative about what we teach and the methods we use to engage our children in studying history.

This term we have introduced a new approach to form 5 history. As a department we were determined to stress the role that History has played in our lives today. We are looking to develop important and broadly applicable skills and to promote a lifelong enjoyment of the subject. We are also keen to develop our children’s knowledge of local history and the place of our school in the local community.

Our expectations are high. Our children are routinely challenged to think critically and we have tried this term to weave our historical studies into a cross curricular approach in Form 5. For the first time, we have put the textbooks and pens to one side and are attempting to understand the history of Edinburgh through a study of local history that encompasses some Geography and RS as well.

Thumbnail IMG 0165

5M gate group

perch_rightColBody

As you will see from the photos the children have been looking at the history of Cargilfield. It’s amazing how engaged they have been about this. One of my favourite activities was a re enactment of the opening of the Cargilfield gates at Barnton Avenue West. This week they walked down to Cramond to explore the Roman fort and explore the origins of Christianity on the site. Dr Barr was on hand to talk to them about this and answer their questions about the Kirk.

We have encouraged our children to think deeply about the questions we ask them and to work in pairs and small groups to encourage peer support and discussion and development of ideas. It is early days but our teaching staff believe that the children are highly engaged and enjoying this process. They are able to talk is detail about the things they are studying and enjoy sharing their ideas.

We have some exciting things planned for the rest of term including a trip to The Royal Mile and a visit to Mary King’s Close. For those of you who don’t know, Mary King’s Close is a warren of late medieval streets located under the City Chambers on the Royal Mile. It became buried in the 18th century and lay undisturbed until a few years ago when it was made safe and opened to the public. The children are apparently looking forward to meeting a few of the ghosts who live down there and hearing about their lives.

We would be interested to hear your feedback as we reflect on how to develop this going forward.

Please feel free to get in touch.

AD

Fort 4

perch_signoff
perch_og_titleWhat is History?
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmail[email protected]
authorPostCount1929
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2019-06-01-what-is-history
postURLFullhttp://www.cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2019-06-01-what-is-history
perch_item_lasttrue
perch_item_zero_index2
perch_item_index3
perch_item_rev_index1
perch_item_rev_zero_index0
perch_item_odd
perch_item_count3
perch_index_in_set3
perch_zero_index_in_set2
perch_last_in_settrue
perch_namespaceperch:blog
Cargilfield

What is History?

A new way to explore the past

Read More


Posted on

Cargilfield where everyday is an adventure

Welcome to Cargilfield! We hope this short film gives you a glimpse of what life is like for the girls and boys at our school. We would love to welcome you in person to tour Cargilfield and explain more fully exactly what makes a Cargilfield education so special and so different. Please get in touch with Fiona Craig, our Registrar if you would like to find out more; her email address is [email protected] or you can telephone her on 0131 336 2207.

Don't Show Again