Archive of: October, 2019

Archive

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextSo much to learn and enjoy!
image/cms/resources/img0480.jpg
imageAltCargilfield
leftColBody

Last week, I was lucky enough to take 26 Form 7 children on a 6 day trip to Normandie, France. The choice of this location is not random: t is close by several important places which can be linked to other subjects. 

Obviously the first objective of the trip is to get the children completely immersed in the language and also discover more about the French culture. It helps them build some confidence and widen their cultural knowledge. However, there is another purpose to this trip. It can give the children a first hand lesson on many other subjects such as Biology, Geography or History to name just a few. 

I know, History is quite obvious with the visits to the WW2 landing sites and memorials plus there is the tapestry of Bayeux (next year’s visit), the Mont St Michel and other fortified cities such as St Malo which I hope to show to some children in a future trip….and not just because there is a famous ice-cream shop there! 

Geography is also an obvious one, especially with the crossing of the bay of Mont Saint Michel and understanding its ecosystem and how quick sand works (and try jumping in it). There is also the visit to the goat cheese farm when we learn more about farming in the region. 

Biology is maybe not as obvious but we do learn a lot about goats and how their digestive system works and about when milk is produced following the reproductive season. There is also an element of chemistry as we found out the different processes to make cheese. 

Adding to all these the culinary discovery (and not just snails!!), Maths (being given a budget to buy their lunch in a market), PE (sports tournament) and you get a full class day outside the classroom!

rightColBody
signoff
og_titleA Trip to France!
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID1012
postID1012
blogID1
postTitleA Trip to France!
postSlug2019-10-09-a-trip-to-france
postDateTime2019-10-09 05:55:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"So much to learn and enjoy!","image":{"assetID":"4866","title":"IMG{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2019-10-09 05:55:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingfalse
total2
number_of_pages1
total_pages1
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound2
prev_url
next_url
prev_page_number
next_page_number
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=10
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=10
first_pagetrue
last_pagetrue
perch_introTextSo much to learn and enjoy!
perch_image/cms/resources/img0480.jpg
perch_imageAltCargilfield
perch_leftColBody

Last week, I was lucky enough to take 26 Form 7 children on a 6 day trip to Normandie, France. The choice of this location is not random: t is close by several important places which can be linked to other subjects. 

Obviously the first objective of the trip is to get the children completely immersed in the language and also discover more about the French culture. It helps them build some confidence and widen their cultural knowledge. However, there is another purpose to this trip. It can give the children a first hand lesson on many other subjects such as Biology, Geography or History to name just a few. 

I know, History is quite obvious with the visits to the WW2 landing sites and memorials plus there is the tapestry of Bayeux (next year’s visit), the Mont St Michel and other fortified cities such as St Malo which I hope to show to some children in a future trip….and not just because there is a famous ice-cream shop there! 

Geography is also an obvious one, especially with the crossing of the bay of Mont Saint Michel and understanding its ecosystem and how quick sand works (and try jumping in it). There is also the visit to the goat cheese farm when we learn more about farming in the region. 

Biology is maybe not as obvious but we do learn a lot about goats and how their digestive system works and about when milk is produced following the reproductive season. There is also an element of chemistry as we found out the different processes to make cheese. 

Adding to all these the culinary discovery (and not just snails!!), Maths (being given a budget to buy their lunch in a market), PE (sports tournament) and you get a full class day outside the classroom!

perch_rightColBody
perch_signoff
perch_og_titleA Trip to France!
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmail[email protected]
authorPostCount1929
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2019-10-09-a-trip-to-france
postURLFullhttp://www.cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2019-10-09-a-trip-to-france
perch_item_firsttrue
perch_item_zero_index0
perch_item_index1
perch_item_rev_index2
perch_item_rev_zero_index1
perch_item_odd
perch_item_count2
perch_index_in_set1
perch_zero_index_in_set0
perch_first_in_settrue
perch_namespaceperch:blog
Cargilfield

A Trip to France!

So much to learn and enjoy!

Read More


Posted on

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextSo much better than 'empty praise'
image/cms/resources/cargilfield-preparatory-school-7o7a2668-photograph-by-angus-bremnerc.jpg
imageAltCargilfield
leftColBody

Constructive praise and encouragement vs ‘empty praise’.

We often use praise because it’s quick and easy. You can throw out a ‘good job!’ or a similar phrase without having to analyse the situation, and this is the problem with it. It’s overused and has lost it’s meaning in our world. Everyone is ‘great!’

On the other hand – encouragement takes a lot more thought and more words but, it helps children to see what they have done. Encouragement helps children want to do better for themselves, not just for pleasing adults.

When you say, “good job,” “beautiful painting,” or “great performance” to a child, the comments become “white noise,” or empty words with little meaning - eventually platitudes not even heard. Praising your child expansively not only devalues the praise, but also prevents him/her from actually knowing what doing a “good job” means.

Praising in glowing terms - especially if it comes after less-than-perfect behaviour or performance -can actually send a message that he or she doesn’t need to try harder to improve.

Children who don’t receive a ‘good job’ or ‘well done’ may come to feel they’re entitled to praise no matter what they do. They start to believe that they can coast along, assuming credit will come anyway. When it doesn’t, they will be unprepared to cope.

Furthermore, when you praise a child who is not doing as well as she could, she ultimately learns to believe she doesn’t have to do better to be accepted. She can coast or feel entitled, expecting that everything should be coming her way whether she strives for her best or not. 

You cheat the child when compliments are hollow.

Constructive praise (encouragement) with specifics and emphasis on performance encourages a child to strive and work harder. Encouragement is effective because it: a) allows you to select a characteristic or behaviour you want to develop or foster in a positive and constructive way, and b) lets you call attention to the process

Here are 6 tips on using words of encouragement for kids effectively.

  1. Praise sincerely and honestly. ...
  2. Be specific and descriptive. ...
  3. Praise effort and the process, not ability. ...
  4. Avoid controlling or conditional praise. ...
  5. Avoid comparison praise. ...
  6. Avoid easy-task praise or over-praise.
rightColBody

Untitled

signoff
og_titleThe Benefits of Constructive Praise
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID991
postID991
blogID1
postTitleThe Benefits of Constructive Praise
postSlug2019-10-02-the-benefits-of-constructive-praise
postDateTime2019-10-02 05:26:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"So much better than 'empty praise'","image":{"assetID":"4784","title":"Cargilfield{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2019-10-02 05:26:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingfalse
total2
number_of_pages1
total_pages1
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound2
prev_url
next_url
prev_page_number
next_page_number
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=10
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?year=2019&month=10
first_pagetrue
last_pagetrue
perch_introTextSo much better than 'empty praise'
perch_image/cms/resources/cargilfield-preparatory-school-7o7a2668-photograph-by-angus-bremnerc.jpg
perch_imageAltCargilfield
perch_leftColBody

Constructive praise and encouragement vs ‘empty praise’.

We often use praise because it’s quick and easy. You can throw out a ‘good job!’ or a similar phrase without having to analyse the situation, and this is the problem with it. It’s overused and has lost it’s meaning in our world. Everyone is ‘great!’

On the other hand – encouragement takes a lot more thought and more words but, it helps children to see what they have done. Encouragement helps children want to do better for themselves, not just for pleasing adults.

When you say, “good job,” “beautiful painting,” or “great performance” to a child, the comments become “white noise,” or empty words with little meaning - eventually platitudes not even heard. Praising your child expansively not only devalues the praise, but also prevents him/her from actually knowing what doing a “good job” means.

Praising in glowing terms - especially if it comes after less-than-perfect behaviour or performance -can actually send a message that he or she doesn’t need to try harder to improve.

Children who don’t receive a ‘good job’ or ‘well done’ may come to feel they’re entitled to praise no matter what they do. They start to believe that they can coast along, assuming credit will come anyway. When it doesn’t, they will be unprepared to cope.

Furthermore, when you praise a child who is not doing as well as she could, she ultimately learns to believe she doesn’t have to do better to be accepted. She can coast or feel entitled, expecting that everything should be coming her way whether she strives for her best or not. 

You cheat the child when compliments are hollow.

Constructive praise (encouragement) with specifics and emphasis on performance encourages a child to strive and work harder. Encouragement is effective because it: a) allows you to select a characteristic or behaviour you want to develop or foster in a positive and constructive way, and b) lets you call attention to the process

Here are 6 tips on using words of encouragement for kids effectively.

  1. Praise sincerely and honestly. ...
  2. Be specific and descriptive. ...
  3. Praise effort and the process, not ability. ...
  4. Avoid controlling or conditional praise. ...
  5. Avoid comparison praise. ...
  6. Avoid easy-task praise or over-praise.
perch_rightColBody

Untitled

perch_signoff
perch_og_titleThe Benefits of Constructive Praise
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmail[email protected]
authorPostCount1929
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2019-10-02-the-benefits-of-constructive-praise
postURLFullhttp://www.cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2019-10-02-the-benefits-of-constructive-praise
perch_item_lasttrue
perch_item_zero_index1
perch_item_index2
perch_item_rev_index1
perch_item_rev_zero_index0
perch_item_oddodd
perch_item_count2
perch_index_in_set2
perch_zero_index_in_set1
perch_last_in_settrue
perch_namespaceperch:blog
Cargilfield

The Benefits of Constructive Praise

So much better than ‘empty praise’

Read More


Posted on

Cargilfield where everyday is an adventure

Welcome to Cargilfield! We hope this short film gives you a glimpse of what life is like for the girls and boys at our school. We would love to welcome you in person to tour Cargilfield and explain more fully exactly what makes a Cargilfield education so special and so different. Please get in touch with Fiona Craig, our Registrar if you would like to find out more; her email address is [email protected] or you can telephone her on 0131 336 2207.

Don't Show Again