How can I support my child at home?

How can I support my child at home?

Importance of reading is key!

How can I support my child outwith school?

“If you want your child to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.” Albert Einstein

We are often asked by parents how they can support their children’s learning at home. Parents are children’s first teachers and therefore a lot of what they have always instinctively done is still valuable.

Reading.

Read to and with your child as much as possible. At school we read to promote a love of literature from an early age. You can do the same. Stories at bedtime are a natural way to settle your child for a good night’s sleep. At the same time you are creating important positive associations with reading and literature. This love of literature is the foundation of your child’s life-long reading experience. Don’t forget to let them see you reading so they appreciate the value of reading as a life-long human skill.

When you are out and about ask your child to read signs for you. These may be street signs or labels on museum items or on monuments. Having a go is much more important than accuracy, and you can help with the hard words. Remember to ask what the sign means.

Writing

When you are out and about get your children to send postcards to their friends and relations. Always carry some stamps and a pen for this purpose. This encourages them to do a manageable amount of writing, and then, in due course, enjoy the positive feedback when people receive their words.

Encourage your children to make notes for you when you are planning a task. For example, dictate your shopping list, then when you get to the supermarket, ask them to read out the items for you. This reinforces the usefulness of writing, and that it is even more than conveying a story.

During the longer breaks encourage your child to create their own journal of their experiences. Allow them to choose a special notebook and encourage them to put in items, e.g. tickets and photos, which they have collected. In addition discuss their treasures and suggest they write notes to explain their significance. The more enthusiastic you are, the more they will want to develop their journal. Do not worry if they do not write a diary as such, just share and enjoy their written reflections.

Numeracy and other mathematical skills.

Depending upon what stage your child is at there are lots of informal ways you can help your child. Get them to read numbers on, say, houses you are passing. Ask which number comes before and after. Ask them to read out prices for you. Practise tables and number bonds when you are stuck in traffic. Make up numerical problems for your child to solve while shopping, e.g. “how many sandwiches will we need if Granny and Grandpa come on our picnic?” Bake with your child as the measuring of ingredients is excellent practice, as well as the baking itself being a vital life skill. Play shops with your child using plastic or real coins. Encourage them to spot 2d and 3d shapes in the home and when you are out and about, and see if they can spot patterns. Encourage your child to tell the time both on analogue and digital clocks, starting with “o’clock”, then “half past” and so on. Play games that involve counting or patterns. Make your home maths-friendly by having equipment such as rulers, scales, etc all readily available. When you use them explain what you are doing to your child. Encourage your child to make comparisons, e.g. which is the heaviest, longest, smallest fastest, hottest, most expensive etc.

Your child’s class teacher can tell you exactly at what level to pitch your questions.

Remember to keep it fun!

Maggie Pithie

Learning Support Teacher

Posted on


How can I support my child at home?

Read, read and read!

The latest in a series of blogs from our teachers on what goes on behind the classroom door. This week it is about how to support your child's learning at home. 

“If you want your child to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.” Albert Einstein.

We are often asked by parents how they can support their children’s learning at home. Parents are children’s first teachers and therefore a lot of what they have always instinctively done is still valuable.

Read more by clicking the link https://www.cargilfield.com/teaching-and-learning/news/

Posted on


Cargilfield Connected

We can’t welcome you to our grounds right now, but we can offer you a virtual tour and we can answer questions via email or telephone. We especially like to chat face-to-face on a video call.

We have places available for 2021 entry in most year groups.

For now, we hope that this video, presented by our Headmaster, Mr Rob Taylor, will give you a flavour of what life is like here at Cargilfield. Our website and social media channels are kept up to date and hold a wealth of information about our school.

Our Registrar, Fiona Craig is available to contact via email: [email protected] and she will be happy to help you. Thank you

Don't Show Again